November’s Snowy Morning Mountains Full Moon

Welcome November Full Moon!

Welcome to Issue 11 of Volume IX of Earth, Moon and Stars!

IN THIS ISSUE
(click any of these section links that interest you)

INTRO

   I’m always happy when I find/make the time to post in advance of the full moon – I’m getting better at getting it out ahead of time, so you might be inspired to go outside and take a full moon bath! I hope you enjoy this issue and take some peace and tranquility from it. And please don’t be shy about expressing your sentiments in the Comment section. Let me know what you like, and what you’d like to see covered in future issues. (Your comments won’t be made public if you ask me to keep them private.)

   And even tho it’s just the beginning of November . . . and much of the lower United States is still trying to shake off summer . . . to the north and into Canada winter has been real for quite some time: in Banff, Alberta, it’s below freezing and snowy. This photo is over Moraine Lake, with snow-frosted mountains in the distance and the Milky Way behind them in the sky.

Milky Way above Moraine Lake (Banff) by Bun Lee (Popular Photography)

WHAT’S COOKIN’

FULLNESS
  The moon will become technically full Saturday November 4 at 05:23 UTC, correspondingly earlier in time zones west of the Prime Meridian, later in time zones to the east. (See my December 2014 issue for some clarification about UTC and 24-hour time.)

   Because technical fullness will occur just before sunrise at the Prime Meridian, the cusp this time will be approximately in the +2 time zone (Eastern Europe, South Africa). Thus the entire Western Hemisphere along with Western Europe will see closest to a full moon Friday night, while Saturday night will be more favorable east of the cusp to the International Date Line. But since to an unaided eye she appears full 24 hours or so either side of technical fullness, you will be treated to apparent fullness at least two nights in a row. Check Seasonal Calendar below for exact times in some representative time zones.

MOON NAMES
   In looking for a name I hadn’t treated in past Novembers, I came across an uncommon one that called to me lyrically: Snowy Morning Mountains Moon. Details, plus some colorful photos — and a little test of your (graphical) detective skills — all at Moon Names.

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Full Moon Over Frozen River

ASTROLOGY
  Cristina in Zodiac Poetry and the astrologers at Dana’s Mooncircles have more personal insights for you at this Taurus full moon. Drop in at Astrology to see what inspiration awaits you.

MOON and STARS HUMOR
  Calvin and Hobbes find a silver lining in the not-so-kind way people are treating Mother Earth. (This also kicks off a space adventure series.) See Humor.

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MOON NAMES

It Actually Is Snowing Somewhere

   As you know, many cultures around the world kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full moon, appropriate for the season in which it occurred and keyed – naturally enough – to the goings-on in their natural environment . . . the weather, the plants, the animals.

   The prevailing name that the Old Farmer’s Almanac and other sources report for November is Beaver Moon.

I included Beaver in the names for my Nov 2011 and Nov 2012 issues. 

Snowy Morning Mountains Moon

.   Other names for this moon besides Beaver include Frosty, Freezing Rivers and Tiger Shark. This time I came across Snowy Morning Mountains Moon, which called to me lyrically. This name was reportedly given by the Wishram peoples — Chinook Native Americans from the Columbia River basin in Oregon.

Full Moon Over Snowy Mountains (Darrell Bush)

   So I have a little quiz for you to see how sharp your detective skills are. In peering at the pictures above and below, what do you notice that doesn’t seem quite natural? You can post your responses in Comments, if you like.

   Come back here after the full moon and see my answers.

What’s un-natural about this picture?

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SEASONAL CALENDAR
Moon Dates and Times

November’s full moon     Sat November 4 05:23 UTC; 7:23 am IST; 1:23 pm AWST/PHT; 4:23 pm AEDT
.                                            Sat November 4 2:23 am ADT; 1:23 am EDT
.                                            Friday November 3 10:23 pm  PDT; 7:23 pm HAST

Daylight Time Ends (USA)        Sunday November 5 2 am (local time)

November’s new moon   Saturday November 18 11:42 UTC; 7:42 am AST; 6:42 am EST; 3:42 am PST
.                                            Saturday November 18 1:42 am HAST; 1:42 pm IST
.                                            Saturday November 18 7:42 pm AWST/PHT; 10:42 pm AEDT

December’s full moon     Sunday December 3 15:47 UTC; 5:47 pm IST; 11:47 pm AWST/PHT
.                                            Sunday December 3 11:47 am AST; 10:47 am EST; 7:47 am PST; 5:47 am HAST
.                                            Monday December 4 2:47 am  AEDT

December’s new moon    Monday December 18 06:30 UTC; 2:30 am AST; 1:30 am EST
.                                            Monday December 18 6:30 am IST; 2:30 pm AWST/PHT; 5:30 pm AEDT
.                                            Sunday December 17 10:30 pm PST; 8:30 pm HAST

December Solstice           Thursday December 21 16:27 UTC; 12:27 pm AST; 11:27 am EST; 8:27 am PST
.                                           Thursday December 21 6:27 am HAST; 6:27 pm IST
.                                           Friday December 22 12:27 am AWST/PHT; 3:27 am AEDT

.                                   Find Full Moon and New Moon times for your local time zone at Moon Giant.

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ASTROLOGY

Moon Travels Through the Zodiac

    Zipping Along. Unlike the Earth – which takes 365+ days to make a complete circuit through the zodiac – the Moon takes just a month to complete an entire round. This means she spends on average only two and a half days in each zodiac sign.

   Opposition. Because at fullness the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun (opposition), it is in the zodiac sign that is opposite the sign that the sun is in. February’s Astrology section has a more detailed explanation.

Zodiac Constellations

Moon in Signs and Void of Course

   Technical astrologers call the times while Ms. Luna is in transition from one sign to the next “void of course”. This is considered to be a sort of neither-here-nor-there state, which many people feel as being unsettled or ungrounded. But as you might suspect, there are a number of ways of looking at and dealing with a VoC moon. Our most recent astrologer discovery Dana Gerhardt offers this interesting and encouraging outlook: “Fall into the Gap” on her Mooncircles website.   

   Each astrologer chooses their own method for calculating times of beginning and ending VoC. You can find interesting (though differing) VoC info and tables at Dr. Standley and at Moontracks.

   Referencing the Moontracks table, we find that Ms. Luna entered the sign of Aries on Wednesday (1st) at 06:42. She will begin exiting Aries — thus becoming VoC — on Friday (3rd) at 03:03, remaining void for just under seven hours. She will then enter Taurus at 09:46 and remain there until Sunday at 09:28, when she will again become void.  58 minutes later she will enter the next sign, Gemini.
(All times here are UTC~Coordinated Universal Time. See my December 2014 issue for some clarification about UTC and 24-hour time.)

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Taurus Full Moon

Cristina ~  

Full Moon in Taurus
Here and Now

   Cristina (formerly known as Æterna) is a professional astrologer/tarot reader based in Italy, who also runs her own website Zodiac Poetry — “Stars – Heart – Soul”, where her emphasis is on introspection and emotions and her love of words and art. She tells her own personal, revealing story on her About Me page.

   Cristina wastes no time at this full moon, wading into the spirit of this season of Samhain . . .

. . . when the veil between worlds is at its thinnest. We seek for a higher guidance, strength and inspiration from the other side through divination, witchcraft, magick, and – to some extent – astrology. 

   After developing this thesis in some depth, Cristina brings in La Luna . . .

Samhain might be around the corner, but with the Moon on her way to fullness […], the realness of our material plane is equally vibrant and palpable as that of the Spirit world.

   Hopefully that’s enough to tempt you to click over to her full article: Full Moon in Taurus “Here and Now”. As always, I promise you won’t be disappointed.

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Shaman Light by Amanda Clark

Dana~     

Mooncircles

   Dana Gerhardt is an internationally respected astrologer and a popular columnist with The Mountain Astrologer since 1991. Her ongoing passions are the moon and living the intuitive life. You can read more about her at Dana’s bio. Her website, Mooncircles, is not just a blog by Dana – it is a professionally produced website where Dana features a number of astrologers writing on various approaches and aspects. You will definitely find something to capture your interest.

Mooncircles:
Taurus Full Moon

   Rather than just one article, Dana’s website features a number of astrologers who offer a variety of personal viewpoints. (This personal approach is one of the big reasons I like her site.) Here are some brief teasers for their offerings at this full moon in Taurus:

  Taurus Full Moon: How I Broke Up with Cheez-its by April Elliott Kent
“My husband recently decided to make a significant change to his diet. Since we eat most of our dinners together, I figured I would jump aboard and try it myself. “[ . . . ]

  Taurus Full Moon: Come to Your Senses by Jessica Shepherd
“Seeking relief, I decide to go shopping but my stress-relieving trip proves more stressful. The mall is crowded with people wearing sour looks. “[ . . . ]

  It’s Green Fire Ritual Time! by Dana Gerhardt
“The Green Fire ritual is a powerful way to signal to your subconscious that you’re ready, willing, and eager to release the past and move on.” [ . . . ]

  3-Minute Moon Ritual by Dana Gerhardt
“Drawing down the moon… Imagine above you the round glowing disc of the moon, bathing you in a protective circle of light. Vibrant with energy, your space is transformed, filled with the purity of spirit.” [ . . . ]

   You can access each article by clicking on its link/thumbnail. Or access all of the above — and lots more — on the home page of Mooncircles.

Full Moon in Taurus

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HUMOR

Calvin and Hobbes

 . . . the indignant philosopher finds a silver lining . . .

   This panel is actually the beginning a series that last month’s was a part of (and thus out of sequence). “Watch this space” as our heroes begin a daring journey . . .

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FROM ME TO YOU

    Thank you, dear reader, for visiting EM&S this “moonth”. I hope you liked it.

   Here’s a little bit about me and what this blog is about. I’ve been fascinated with astronomy ever since I learned to read. I’m also interested in how objects in the heavens influence people. In this blog I collect facts and folklore (mostly from the Web) about our moon and other sky phenomena.

   If you especially liked something you saw here, or would like to see something in particular covered in a future issue, or you have something interesting about the Earth, Moon, or Stars you would like to share, please feel free to leave a comment. I’m always interested in how folks who stop by here are moved/influenced/affected by what they encounter here. And please don’t be shy about sharing this post with friends if you like it!

   Note that I have a separate post called ARCHIVES which contains a list of all the titles I’ve posted since the inception of this blog. The titles are clickable of course. Easier and more informative than just the dates that appear in the right-side Archives column. (I’m slowly learning more things I can make WordPress do. There’s a lot there!)

   Until the full moon in December,
here’s wishing you and me and all of us
a month of groundedness, focus, and family.

~ Moonlight to all!
Marty

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INTENTION FOR THIS EARTH, MOON AND STARS BLOG

   The Earth, Moon and Stars blog is published once each Full Moon with facts and lore about our moon and other sky phenomena that I find interesting. My wish is that you will have fun learning a bit more about heavenly objects, especially our one and only natural satellite and how all of us — people, animals, plants, water, even rocks — are affected and connected by her.

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MY PERSONAL TAKE ON ASTROLOGY

  Some folks have wondered why I have an astrology section in a blog that purports to be “science” oriented. I suppose I could cite ancient cultures in which astronomy and astrology were the domain of the same person. And that a broader way of understanding the aim of science is to expand knowledge (the word science being derived from the Latin word  scīre “to know”). My own sense is that while we humans live in a material world that runs by certain rules of physics, we each experience our lives in this world subjectively. It’s what makes us similar and at the same time unique.
   How much do celestial bodies influence our lives? Certainly the Sun and the Moon have noticeable gravitational effects on water and even rocks. Electromagnetic and particle radiation from the Sun has both obvious and subtle effects on just about everything on this planet. Even moonlight affects plants and animals.  I do not claim to know if or how much these and other celestial bodies affect us directly, but I like the wisdom, warmth and humanness that the astrologers I feature express in their writing, and believe that including them not only expands my potential audience, but also exposes folks to ways of thinking about their own lives that they might not have otherwise considered. Let me know your take on this. I won’t make your comment public if you ask me not to.

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A NOTE ON WRITING STYLE

    A few detail-oriented folks have inquired about my use (or mis-use) of Initial Caps in words like earth, moon, and sun. In the long run, it doesn’t affect understanding; whether I write ”the President” or “the president”, you still know who I’m referring to. I write “the Northern Hemisphere”, just as you would (correctly) write “the West Coast”; it’s a proper name, and in English we capitalize proper names.

    When it comes to suns and moons it can get confusing. There are billions of suns out there; we have given names to more than 40 million of them, ranging from names given in other languages (e.g., Aldebaran), to less fanciful but more utilitarian names, such as HD 140913. The International Astronomical Union (IAU) has decreed that our sun is the only one without such a proper name, although historically and in poesy it’s been called by quite a few.

    Similarly for our moon. We’ve christened all of the other 182 moons in our solar system with names – ours is the only one we call the Moon.

    Since we capitalize the names of all the other heavenly bodies (even asteroids and comets, for pity’s sake), I feel we ought to show at least as much respect for the ones most important to us. The IAU agrees.

    So does Wikipedia. Their Manual of Style says: “The words sun, earth, moon and solar system are capitalized (as proper names) when used in an astronomical context to refer to a specific celestial body (our Sun, Earth, Moon and Solar System): The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System; The Moon orbits the Earth. They are not capitalized when used outside an astronomical context (The sky was clear and the sun felt warm), or when used in a general sense (Io is a moon of Jupiter).”

    Sometimes it’s a fine line. If I write “by the light of the silvery moon”, I won’t capitalize it, because I’m referring to an image of the celestial body, not the body itself. By contrast, if I write, “the light from the Sun reflects off the surface of the Moon,” I capitalize both, because I’m referring directly to the celestial bodies.

    If you inspect the archives of this blog, you will likely see many instances where I departed from this rule. We’ll call these oversights, and eventually I will correct them. Meanwhile, it’s an interesting challenge just to follow it in new writings. Are we having fun, yet?

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COPYRIGHT DISCLAIMER

Unless otherwise noted, this blog claims no credit for any images or compositions (e.g. art, songs, poetry) appearing on it. Copyrighted works remain the property of their respective owners; permission, attribution and/or links are provided when applicable or known. If there is content appearing on this blog that belongs to you and you do not wish for it to appear here, please leave a comment with your email address and a link to the item in question, and it will be promptly removed. Your comment will not be made public.

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October’s Falling Leaves Full Moon

Welcome October Full Moon!

Welcome to Issue 10 of Volume IX of Earth, Moon and Stars!

IN THIS ISSUE
(click any of these section links that interest you)

INTRO

   Abbreviated issue this month; most of my recent time has been dedicated to preparing for highly anticipated visit by my daughters this coming weekend. But I still managed to find some neat pics for your enjoyment. Of course, our two fab astrologers Cristina and Dana. And we certainly couldn’t close without another visit from Calvin and Hobbes.

   With all the troubles in the world, I hope you will make some time —  even if just a few minutes — bathing in La Luna’s calming light. It just came to me that she’s like a filter – or perhaps a transmogrifier – that absorbs the Sun’s fiery, sometimes angry, outbursts and converts them into soothing, peaceful waves. May you find tranquility . . .

   These cats have the right idea. And they aren’t forgetting that Halloween is coming . . .

WHAT’S COOKIN’

FULLNESS
  The moon will become technically full Thursday October 5 at 18:40 UTC, correspondingly earlier in time zones west of the Prime Meridian, later in time zones to the east. (See my December 2014 issue for some clarification about UTC and 24-hour time.)

   Because technical fullness will occur just after sunset at the Prime Meridian, almost all places on the globe will see closest to a full moon Thursday night. But since to an unaided eye she appears full 24 hours or so either side of technical fullness, you will be convinced that she is full on Wednesday and Friday nights, as well. That gives you extra odds if you are dealing with potentially cloudy skies. Check Seasonal Calendar below for exact times in some representative time zones.

MOON NAMES
   Looking for a name I hadn’t treated in past Octobers, I realized I hadn’t yet featured the second most common name for October, Falling Leaves moon. Details on this and the late Harvest Moon, plus some colorful photos — all in Moon Names.

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CELEBRATIONS
  The annual Asian Mid-Autumn Festival – second only in importance behind the lunar New Year. Check out Celebrations for info, art, and haiku.

ASTROLOGY
  Cristina in Zodiac Poetry and the astrologers at Dana’s Mooncircles have more personal insights for you at this Aries full moon. Drop in at Astrology to see what inspiration awaits you.

MOON and STARS HUMOR
  Calvin takes Hobbes go on a space trek. See Humor.

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MOON NAMES

Harvest Moon Late This Year

   As you know, many cultures around the world kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full moon, appropriate for the season in which it occurred and keyed – naturally enough – to the goings-on in their natural environment . . . the weather, the plants, the animals.

   The prevailing name that the Old Farmer’s Almanac and other sources report for October is Hunter’s Moon, the full moon following the Harvest Moon. But tradition insists that the Harvest Moon is the full moon closest to the Autumnal equinox, so the wrinkle this year is that the October full moon, coming so early in October, is actually three days closer to the equinox than the September full moon was, so it’s Harvest Moon this month instead of September as usual. Until this year we featured the Harvest Moon each September since I began this blog in 2011; no other month had been so saturated. Check out my Sept 2013 and Sept 2015 back issues for more Harvest Moon info and fun. And see this EarthSky article When is the Harvest Moon.

Falling Leaves Moon

Hunter’s Halloween Moon
.   The most common name for the October full moon is the Hunter’s Moon, which we’ve treated in past October issues: 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014. In 2015 we took a sharp turn into the inventive with the Great Pumpkin Moon – a severely entertaining Halloween issue that I still get a kick out of re-reading. And last year in 2016 it was the Big Chestnut Moon.

   In honor of its being Halloween time again …

Falling Leaves Moon
.  No explanation needed as to why the Arapaho, Chippewa and Ojibwe named this moon “falling leaves. And the Lakota with their poetic “moon when the wind shakes off leaves”.  My go-to American Indians Moons site lists the Sioux (Great Plains, Dakotas, Nebraska) as reserving “falling leaves moon” for November. But these tribes weren’t using the Western calendar, so I’m going to roll them in with the other guys for this issue.

   We’ve all seen falling leaves. Here’s another pic I found that captures this theme and the season. Check out the artist’s source page for the interesting background on his inspiration. (Hint – notice the antlers the young woman is sporting.)

“The Leaf Charmer” ~ Drawing Down the Leaves (by Runique)

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SEASONAL CALENDAR
Moon Dates and Times

October’s full moon         Thursday October 5 18:40 UTC; 3:40 pm ADT; 2:40 pm EDT; 11:40 am PDT
.                                            Thursday October 5 9:40 pm IDT; 8:40 am HAST
.                                            Friday October 6 2:40 am  AWST/PHT; 5:40 am AEDT

October’s new moon        Thursday October 19 19:12 UTC; 4:12 pm ADT; 3:12 pm EDT; 12:12 pm PDT
.                                            Thursday October 19 9:12 am HAST; 10:12 pm IDT
.                                            Friday October 20 3:12 am AWST/PHT; 6:12 am AEDT

November’s full moon     Sat November 4 05:23 UTC; 7:23 am IST; 1:23 pm AWST/PHT; 4:23 pm AEDT
.                                            Sat November 4 2:23 am ADT; 1:23 am EDT
.                                            Friday November 3 10:23 pm  PDT; 7:23 pm HAST

November’s new moon   Saturday November 18 11:42 UTC; 7:42 am AST; 6:42 am EST; 3:42 am PST
.                                            Saturday November 18 1:42 am HAST; 1:42 pm IST
.                                            Saturday November 18 7:42 pm AWST/PHT; 10:42 pm AEDT

.                               Check Moon Giant to find Full Moon and New Moon times for your local time zone.

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MOON CELEBRATIONS

Asian Mid-Autumn Festival

Mooncake Festival
.   In China, Taiwan, Vietnam and other parts of Asia, the focus at this full moon is on the annual Mid-Autumn Festival, which is East Asia’s
harvest festival. Officially beginning this year on October 4 (by the Western calendar), celebrations all over Asia are already underway.

   This holiday is also referred to as the Moon Festival in honor of this full moon. It’s also called the Mooncake Festival, named after a traditional baked delicacy exchanged among family and friends.  It is the second most important festival in China after the Chinese New Year.

   To the Chinese, the festival means family reunion and peace. Quoting eBeijing: “Watching the full moon on the night of the Mid-Autumn Festival is the best activity for the whole family. It is a custom for people to ascend towers and terraces and have a good chat in the full moon night while drinking wine and eating delicacies. The scene of blooming flowers, full moon and family reunion is poetic and charming.”

Bashō meets two farmers celebrating the mid-autumn moon

   The above print by Yoshitoshi depicts famous Japanese haiku poet Matsuo Bashō meeting two farmers who are celebrating the mid-autumn moon festival. It is from Yoshitoshi’s collection One Hundred Aspects of the Moon. The haiku in the print reads: “Since the crescent moon, I have been waiting for tonight.” The crescent moon is in reference to the first day of the lunar month, which is always a new moon. The festival is always on the 15th day of the 8th month of the lunar year, thus making it occur at the full moon. 

   I featured this festival also in last year’s September issue. Check it out . . .

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ASTROLOGY

Moon Travels Through the Zodiac

    Zipping Along. Unlike the Earth – which takes 365+ days to make a complete circuit through the zodiac – the Moon takes just a month to complete an entire round. This means she spends on average only two and a half days in each zodiac sign.

   Opposition. Because at fullness the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun (opposition), it is in the zodiac sign that is opposite the sign that the sun is in. February’s Astrology section has a more detailed explanation.

Zodiac Constellations

Moon in Signs and Void of Course

   Technical astrologers call the times while Ms. Luna is in transition from one sign to the next “void of course”. This is considered to be a sort of neither-here-nor-there state, which many people feel as being unsettled or ungrounded. But as you might suspect, there are a number of ways of looking at and dealing with a VoC moon. Our most recent astrologer discovery Dana Gerhardt offers this interesting and encouraging outlook: “Fall into the Gap” on her Mooncircles website.   

   Each astrologer chooses their own method for calculating times of beginning and ending VoC. You can find interesting (though differing) VoC info and tables at Dr. Standley and at Moontracks.

   Referencing the Moontracks table, we find that Ms. Luna entered the sign of Pisces on Monday (2nd) at 02:26. She will begin exiting Pisces — thus becoming VoC — on Wednesday (4th) at 07:19, remaining void for thirteen hours and twenty minutes. She will then enter Aries at 20:39 and remain there for (1 minute shy of) 50 hours; (2 minutes shy of) 28 hours past fullness. The next day — Friday (6th) — she will leave Aries at 22:38 and remain void for less than two hours, then entering the next sign, Taurus, at 23:56.
(All times here are UTC~Coordinated Universal Time. See my December 2014 issue for some clarification about UTC and 24-hour time.)

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“Illumination” by Freydoon Rassoulirassouli.com

Cristina ~  

Full Moon in Aries
Fire

   Cristina (formerly known as Æterna) is a professional astrologer/tarot reader based in Italy, who also runs her own website Zodiac Poetry — “Stars – Heart – Soul”, where her emphasis is on introspection and emotions and her love of words and art. She tells her own personal, revealing story on her About Me page.

   Cristina opens her primal/animal-focused piece this month, which she calls “Fire”, with  this salvo. . .

Fire, in all its emanations – raw power, sexuality, rage, ecstasy – has its own spiritual dignity, its noble, remarkable application, as well as teachings that we should not downplay or overlook. Identifying as “spiritual” doesn’t necessarily have to mandatorily coincide with a constant, uni-dimensional state of equanimity, imperturbability, or even neutrality.

   After developing this thesis in some depth, Cristina brings in La Luna . . .

The Moon symbolizes our habitual responses and instinctive patterns, which, during this Full Moon, are propelled by the Cardinal quality of Aries, the first sign of the Zodiac, and the most individualistic one.

   And finally, Cristina finishes up with . . .

Our fire is precious and life-sustaining, and we need to direct it wisely . . .

   Hopefully that’s enough to tempt you to click over to her full article: Full Moon in Aries “Fire”. I promise you won’t be disappointed.

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Dana~  

Mooncircles

   Dana Gerhardt is an internationally respected astrologer and a popular columnist with The Mountain Astrologer since 1991. Her ongoing passions are the moon and living the intuitive life. You can read more about her at Dana’s bio. Her website, Mooncircles, is not just a blog by Dana – it is a professionally produced website where Dana features a number of astrologers writing on various approaches and aspects. You will definitely find something to capture your interest.

Mooncircles:
Aries Full Moon

   Rather than just one article, Dana’s website features a number of astrologers who offer a variety of personal viewpoints. (This personal approach is one of the big reasons I like her site.) Here are some brief teasers for her offerings at this full moon in Aries:

  Aries Full Moon: Keep Fighting by April Elliott Kent
“The first message in my Facebook feed this morning was from my nephew, marking himself safe in “The Violent Incident in Las Vegas.” [ . . . ]

  Aries Full Moon: Born This Way by Jessica Shepherd
“You know those times when you feel too tender, too fragile, when just about anything can set you over the edge? I was on that edge.” [ . . . ]

  Aphrodite Medicine for a Fractured Full Moon by Dana Gerhardt
“Full Moon rituals are medicine. And the one I offer you this month draws from the potency of Libra–where the Sun sits, sign opposite the Warrior’s Moon in Aries.” [ . . . ]

  3-Minute Moon Ritual by Dana Gerhardt
“Imagine that you have become a Full Moon goddess, capable of balancing the earth and harmonizing its opposing forces.” [ . . . ]

   You can access each article by clicking on its link/thumbnail, or all of the above — and lots more — on the home page of Mooncircles.

Aries Full Moon

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HUMOR

Calvin and Hobbes

 . . . in space . . .

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FROM ME TO YOU

    Thank you, dear reader, for visiting EM&S this “moonth”. I hope you liked it.

   Here’s a little bit about me and what this blog is about. I’ve been fascinated with astronomy ever since I learned to read. I’m also interested in how objects in the heavens influence people. In this blog I collect facts and folklore (mostly from the Web) about our moon and other sky phenomena.

   If you especially liked something you saw here, or would like to see something in particular covered in a future issue, or you have something interesting about the Earth, Moon, or Stars you would like to share, please feel free to leave a comment. I’m always interested in how folks who stop by here are moved/influenced/affected by what they encounter here. And please don’t be shy about sharing this post with friends if you like it!

   Note that I have a separate post called ARCHIVES which contains a list of all the titles I’ve posted since the inception of this blog. The titles are clickable of course. Easier and more informative than just the dates that appear in the right-side Archives column. (I’m slowly learning more things I can make WordPress do. There’s a lot there!)

   Until the full moon in November,
here’s wishing you and me and all of us
a month of opening.

~ Moonlight to all!
Marty

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INTENTION FOR THIS EARTH, MOON AND STARS BLOG

   The Earth, Moon and Stars blog is published once each Full Moon with facts and lore about our moon and other sky phenomena that I find interesting. My wish is that you will have fun learning a bit more about heavenly objects, especially our one and only natural satellite and how all of us — people, animals, plants, water, even rocks — are affected and connected by her.

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MY PERSONAL TAKE ON ASTROLOGY

  Some folks have wondered why I have an astrology section in a blog that purports to be “science” oriented. I suppose I could cite ancient cultures in which astronomy and astrology were the domain of the same person. And that a broader way of understanding the aim of science is to expand knowledge (the word science being derived from the Latin word  scīre “to know”). My own sense is that while we humans live in a material world that runs by certain rules of physics, we each experience our lives in this world subjectively. It’s what makes us similar and at the same time unique.
   How much do celestial bodies influence our lives? Certainly the Sun and the Moon have noticeable gravitational effects on water and even rocks. Electromagnetic and particle radiation from the Sun has both obvious and subtle effects on just about everything on this planet. Even moonlight affects plants and animals.  I do not claim to know if or how much these and other celestial bodies affect us directly, but I like the wisdom, warmth and humanness that the astrologers I feature express in their writing, and believe that including them not only expands my potential audience, but also exposes folks to ways of thinking about their own lives that they might not have otherwise considered. Let me know your take on this. I won’t make your comment public if you ask me not to.

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A NOTE ON WRITING STYLE

    A few detail-oriented folks have inquired about my use (or mis-use) of Initial Caps in words like earth, moon, and sun. In the long run, it doesn’t affect understanding; whether I write ”the President” or “the president”, you still know who I’m referring to. I write “the Northern Hemisphere”, just as you would (correctly) write “the West Coast”; it’s a proper name, and in English we capitalize proper names.

    When it comes to suns and moons it can get confusing. There are billions of suns out there; we have given names to more than 40 million of them, ranging from names given in other languages (e.g., Aldebaran), to less fanciful but more utilitarian names, such as HD 140913. The International Astronomical Union (IAU) has decreed that our sun is the only one without such a proper name, although historically and in poesy it’s been called by quite a few.

    Similarly for our moon. We’ve christened all of the other 182 moons in our solar system with names – ours is the only one we call the Moon.

    Since we capitalize the names of all the other heavenly bodies (even asteroids and comets, for pity’s sake), I feel we ought to show at least as much respect for the ones most important to us. The IAU agrees.

    So does Wikipedia. Their Manual of Style says: “The words sun, earth, moon and solar system are capitalized (as proper names) when used in an astronomical context to refer to a specific celestial body (our Sun, Earth, Moon and Solar System): The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System; The Moon orbits the Earth. They are not capitalized when used outside an astronomical context (The sky was clear and the sun felt warm), or when used in a general sense (Io is a moon of Jupiter).”

    Sometimes it’s a fine line. If I write “by the light of the silvery moon”, I won’t capitalize it, because I’m referring to an image of the celestial body, not the body itself. By contrast, if I write, “the light from the Sun reflects off the surface of the Moon,” I capitalize both, because I’m referring directly to the celestial bodies.

    If you inspect the archives of this blog, you will likely see many instances where I departed from this rule. We’ll call these oversights, and eventually I will correct them. Meanwhile, it’s an interesting challenge just to follow it in new writings. Are we having fun, yet?

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COPYRIGHT DISCLAIMER

Unless otherwise noted, this blog claims no credit for any images or compositions (e.g. art, songs, poetry) appearing on it. Copyrighted works remain the property of their respective owners; permission, attribution and/or links are provided when applicable or known. If there is content appearing on this blog that belongs to you and you do not wish for it to appear here, please leave a comment with your email address and a link to the item in question, and it will be promptly removed. Your comment will not be made public.

Posted in Astrology, astronomy, Constellations, Folklore, moon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

September’s Snow Goose Full Moon

Welcome September Full Moon!

Welcome to Issue 9 of Volume IX of Earth, Moon and Stars!

IN THIS ISSUE
(click any of these section links that interest you)

INTRO

   Hasn’t the world always been a crazy place? Or at least parts of it? Maybe it’s all a bad dream, with pockets of wonderfulness. Or maybe it’s a wonderful dream, with pockets of craziness. In any event, I think it’s good we all get a chance to escape the world for few hours each night. May you have beautiful moondreams…

WHAT’S COOKIN’

FULLNESS
  The moon will become technically full Wednesday September 6 at 07:02 UTC, correspondingly earlier in time zones west of the Prime Meridian, later in time zones to the east. (See my December 2014 issue for some clarification about UTC and 24-hour time.)

   Because technical fullness will occur about seven hours after midnight at the Prime Meridian, the cusp this time will fall about six hours to the east of the United Kingdom — in the time zone of Pakistan and Kazakhstan. This means the entire Western Hemisphere along with Europe and Africa will see closest to maximum fullness on Tuesday night, while Wednesday night will favor Asia and points east to the International Date Line. But note that she will appear full to the unaided eye 24 hours or so either side of technical fullness, so that gives you extra odds if you are dealing with clouds.  Check Seasonal Calendar below for exact times in some representative time zones.

MOON NAMES
   I thought it would be a nice idea to counter the punishing heat and hurricanes in North America with a cooling thought, so Snow Goose Moon made it to the top. Check out the graceful beauty in Moon Names.

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Moonlight Shadows by Otto Hutter

SKYWATCH
   Taking a look back on the recent “really big shew” plus an interesting question about it. Also ~ looking ahead to the next two total solar eclipses. Head to Skywatch for details.

ASTROLOGY
  Cristina in Zodiac Poetry and the astrologers at Dana’s Mooncircles have more personal insights for you at this Pisces full moon. Drop in at Astrology to see what inspiration awaits you.

MOON and STARS HUMOR
  Calvin ponders, Hobbes wonders. See Humor.

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MOON NAMES

Snow Goose Moon

Moon Names
.   Although the September full moon has been given many different names by a variety of peoples, most folks are familiar with Harvest Moon. I didn’t realize until I checked just now that I’ve featured Harvest Moon each September since I began this blog in 2011; no other month has been so saturated. In 2013 I worked in Great Pumpkin Moon, and Mulberry Moon last year. 

Harvest Moon
.  Popular folklore defines the Harvest Moon as the full moon closest to the Autumnal Equinox. In most years this is the September full moon, since the equinox is about a week past the middle of September. However, since this year the moon becomes full near the beginning of both September and October, the October moon is actually closer to the equinox, thus folklorically speaking the October full moon will be the Harvest Moon. But i
t’s very close to being a tossup, and there is also a real astronomical piece to it beyond the folklore. If you can’t wait for the full explanation here next month, this EarthSky article When is the Harvest Moon reveals all.

Snow Geese by Lisa Graa Jensen

Snow Goose Moon
.  In searching for a different theme this time, snow wasn’t the first thought that came to me, since it’s just the beginning of September, and many parts of the United States are just recovering from a tortuous heat wave and/or floods. But further north the “white geese” are feeling the change in season and getting ready to head south for the winter. That’s why the Cree people in what is now Canada called this full moon the “
Snow Goose Moon.” And besides, thinking about snow helps cool my overheated head.

Snow Goose Moon by John Ashley

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SEASONAL CALENDAR
Moon Dates and Times

September’s full moon    Wednesday September 6 07:02 UTC; 4:02 am ADT; 3:02 am EDT; 12:02 am PDT
.                                            Wednesday September 6 10:02 am IDT; 3:02 pm AWST/PHT; 5:02 pm AEST
.                                            Tuesday September 5 9:02 pm HAST

September’s new moon   Wednesday September 20 05:30 UTC; 2:30 am ADT; 1:30 am EDT
.                                             Wednesday September 20 8:30 am IDT; 1:30 pm AWST/PHT; 3:30 pm AEST
.                                             Tuesday September 19 7:30 pm HAST; 10:30 pm PDT

September Equinox         Friday September 22 20:01 UTC; 4:01 pm EDT; 1:01 pm PDT

October’s full moon         Thursday October 5 18:40 UTC; 3:40 pm ADT; 2:40 pm EDT; 11:40 am PDT
.                                            Thursday October 5 9:40 pm IDT; 8:40 am HAST
.                                            Friday October 6 2:40 am  AWST/PHT; 5:40 am AEDT

October’s new moon        Thursday October 19 19:12 UTC; 4:12 pm ADT; 3:12 pm EDT; 12:12 pm PDT
.                                            Thursday October 19 9:12 am HAST; 10:12 pm IDT
.                                            Friday October 20 3:12 am AWST/PHT; 6:12 am AEDT

.                               Check Moon Giant to find Full Moon and New Moon times for your local time zone.

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SKYWATCH

AFTERMATH OF THE ECLIPSE

   Well, it happened just as predicted! (How DO they get it so accurate?!)

   Unless you were in a coma, you certainly have seen many photos and videos of this eclipse. Here’s one that caught my attention — it’s a composite photo by Jasman Mander (manderstudio), taken while in the Mount Jefferson Wilderness, Oregon:

Eclipse from Mount Jefferson Wilderness, OR | Composite photo by Jasman Mander

   But perhaps not all your questions were answered. Let’s take a look at one that people either ask outright, or noticed but never really questioned. And that is:

How is it that the moon just exactly covers the sun?

   We’re going to give the short answer(s) here, and revisit it before the next worldwide solar eclipse in 2019. The magical answer is that the Moon is currently just far enough away from us here on terra firma that its apparent size is just about the same as the apparent size of the sun. None of the other 180 moons that we’ve discovered in our Solar System can make such a claim. (There may be billions of other moons out there, but they’re too far away for our current technology to detect.)

   The key words in the above paragraph are:  apparent,  just about, and currently.

   Apparent size is fairly self-evident. Objects we see in the sky obey the same rules of optics that objects here on Earth do; that mountain in the distance or your mother-in-law grows larger as you approach it/her. Well, they don’t actually grow larger; they just appear to. The Sun’s diameter is about 400 times that of the Moon, but/and it is also (conveniently) about 400 times further away from us. So their apparent sizes are just about the same.

   And there’s the rub: there are no “exacts” in space — everything is in motion, and that’s what the just about is about. Because the Moon’s orbit is elliptical and not a perfect circle, the Moon moves closer to us (perigee) then further from us (apogee) each month. Similarly with the Earth’s annual orbit around the Sun. So if the Moon and Sun and Earth line up when the Moon is near apogee, its apparent size is smaller than the sun’s and instead of a total eclipse, we see an “annular” one.

Total (moon closer in)

Annular (moon further away)

 

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   The currently part is even more fascinating, I think.  The Moon used to orbit the Earth much closer than it is now, so solar eclipses were more complete and there were no “annular” eclipses. Due to the ongoing gravitational tug-of-war between the two, the Moon’s orbital speed is gradually slowing, and it is thus creeping further and further away. So in a mere half a billion years from now, its apparent size will be too small to cover the sun’s image, and there won’t be any total solar eclipses. So let’s make merry while we may!

   If you’re still hungry for more on this, check out EarthSky’s good article “Coincidence that sun and moon seem same size?” 

Coming Eclipses

   While the August 21 eclipse was the first time a total solar eclipse had crossed the United States since 1918, you won’t have to wait as long for the next one in 2024. However, whereas the 1918 and 2017 shadows followed fairly similar paths from northwest to southeast, the path on April 8, 2024 will be distinctly different, traveling from mid-south to northeast, sweeping up from Mexico, through Texas, and through Maine. So if you got a taste of this recent one and are salivating for more — or if you missed it and don’t want to miss the next one — you could start now by stroking your chin whilst studying a map.

   And if seven years is too long to wait, the next total solar eclipse worldwide will occur in less than two years: on July 2, 2019. It’s not too soon to start planning: the shadow will cross the southern Pacific Ocean, then across Chile and Argentina — cruises are already being booked and hotels are taking reservations now.

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ASTROLOGY

Moon Travels Through the Zodiac

    Zipping Along. Unlike the Earth – which takes 365+ days to make a complete circuit through the zodiac – the Moon takes just a month to complete an entire round. This means she spends on average only two and a half days in each zodiac sign.

   Opposition. Because at fullness the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun (opposition), it is in the zodiac sign that is opposite the sign that the sun is in. February’s Astrology section has a more detailed explanation.

Moon in Signs and Void of Course

   Technical astrologers call the times while Ms. Luna is in transition from one sign to the next “void of course”. This is considered to be a sort of neither-here-nor-there state, which many people feel as being unsettled or ungrounded. But as you might suspect, there are a number of ways of looking at and dealing with a VoC moon. Our most recent astrologer discovery Dana Gerhardt offers this interesting and encouraging outlook: “Fall into the Gap” on her Mooncircles website.   

   Each astrologer chooses their own method for calculating times of beginning and ending VoC. You can find interesting (though differing) VoC info and tables at Dr. Standley and at Moontracks.

   Referencing the Moontracks table, we find that Ms. Luna entered the sign of Aquarius on Saturday (2nd) at 20:06. She will begin exiting Aquarius — thus becoming VoC — on Tuesday (5th) at 05:15, remaining void for only thirteen minutes. She will then enter Pisces at 05:28 and remain there for 39 hours; more than 13 hours past fullness. The next day — Wednesday (6th) — she will leave Pisces at 20:28 and become void again. This time she will be void for 15 1/2 hours, after which she will enter the next sign, Aries, on Thursday (7th) at 12:01.
(All times here are UTC~Coordinated Universal Time. See my December 2014 issue for some clarification about UTC and 24-hour time.)

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Cristina ~  

Full Moon in Pisces
Oceans

   Cristina (formerly known as Æterna) is a professional astrologer/tarot reader based in Italy, who also runs her own website Zodiac Poetry — “Stars – Heart – Soul”, where her emphasis is on introspection and emotions and her love of words and art. She tells her own personal, revealing story on her About Me page.

   In her water-focused piece this month, which she calls “Oceans”, Cristina observes . . .

. . . while water is shapeless, its yielding changeability is the secret of her strength and endurance and her ability to flow around obstacles [and that] Pisces symbolizes the timeless ocean of transcendence.

She goes on to wisely note that . . .

Indeed, we thirst for Spirit in the same way we thirst for water. Either consciously or unconsciously, we strive to return to the otherworldly feeling of wholeness that is imprinted in the memory of our Soul.

 Well, if that grabbed your attention the way it did mine, I promise you you won’t be disappointed by her full article: Full Moon in Pisces “Oceans”.

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Dana~  

Mooncircles

   Dana Gerhardt is an internationally respected astrologer and a popular columnist with The Mountain Astrologer since 1991. Her ongoing passions are the moon and living the intuitive life. You can read more about her at Dana’s bio. Her website, Mooncircles, is not just a blog by Dana – it is a professionally produced website where Dana features a number of astrologers writing on various approaches and aspects. You will definitely find something to capture your interest.

Mooncircles:
Pisces Full Moon

   Rather than just one article, Dana’s website features a number of astrologers who offer a variety of personal viewpoints. (This personal approach is one of the big reasons I like her site.) Here are some brief teasers for her offerings at this full moon in Pisces:

  Pisces Full Moon ~ The World Without Us by April Elliott Kent
“Our wise Pisces natures shrug in cheerful acceptance of life’s inherent messiness, the missed deadlines, the world in disarray, and the house that needs dusting.” [ . . . ]

  Pisces Full Moon: Do Nothing by Jessica Shepherd
“The month the Sun is in Virgo can be merciless and tricky when self-perfection leads to our self-undoing. ” [ . . . ]

  The Goddesses Meditation by Dana Gerhardt
“It’s crazy out there. If recent weeks have unmoored you, the Pisces Full Moon is an ideal time to visit the invisible world and support yourself.” [ . . . ]

  3-Minute Moon Ritual by Dana Gerhardt
“Draw your hands to your heart. Feel that you have become the goddess [ . . . ]”

   You can access each article by clicking on its link/thumbnail, or all of the above — and lots more — on the home page of Mooncircles.

Pisces Full Moon

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HUMOR

Calvin and Hobbes

   Perspective . . .

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FROM ME TO YOU

    Thank you, dear reader, for visiting EM&S this “moonth”. I hope you liked it.

   Here’s a little bit about me and what this blog is about. I’ve been fascinated with astronomy ever since I learned to read. I’m also interested in how objects in the heavens influence people. In this blog I collect facts and folklore (mostly from the Web) about our moon and other sky phenomena.

   If you especially liked something you saw here, or would like to see something in particular covered in a future issue, or you have something interesting about the Earth, Moon, or Stars you would like to share, please feel free to leave a comment. I’m always interested in how folks who stop by here are moved/influenced/affected by what they encounter here. And please don’t be shy about sharing this post with friends if you like it!

   Note that I have a separate post called ARCHIVES which contains a list of all the titles I’ve posted since the inception of this blog. The titles are clickable of course. Easier and more informative than just the dates that appear in the right-side Archives column. (I’m slowly learning more things I can make WordPress do. There’s a lot there!)

   Until the full moon in October,
here’s wishing you and me and all of us
a month of calm and connectedness.

~ Moonlight to all!
Marty

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INTENTION FOR THIS EARTH, MOON AND STARS BLOG

   The Earth, Moon and Stars blog is published once each Full Moon with facts and lore about our moon and other sky phenomena that I find interesting. My wish is that you will have fun learning a bit more about heavenly objects, especially our one and only natural satellite and how all of us — people, animals, plants, water, even rocks — are affected and connected by her.

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MY PERSONAL TAKE ON ASTROLOGY

  Some folks have wondered why I have an astrology section in a blog that purports to be “science” oriented. I suppose I could cite ancient cultures in which astronomy and astrology were the domain of the same person. And that a broader way of understanding the aim of science is to expand knowledge (the word science being derived from the Latin word  scīre “to know”). My own sense is that while we humans live in a material world that runs by certain rules of physics, we each experience our lives in this world subjectively. It’s what makes us similar and at the same time unique.
   How much do celestial bodies influence our lives? Certainly the Sun and the Moon have noticeable gravitational effects on water and even rocks. Electromagnetic and particle radiation from the Sun has both obvious and subtle effects on just about everything on this planet. Even moonlight affects plants and animals.  I do not claim to know if or how much these and other celestial bodies affect us directly, but I like the wisdom, warmth and humanness that the astrologers I feature express in their writing, and believe that including them not only expands my potential audience, but also exposes folks to ways of thinking about their own lives that they might not have otherwise considered. Let me know your take on this. I won’t make your comment public if you ask me not to.

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A NOTE ON WRITING STYLE

    A few detail-oriented folks have inquired about my use (or mis-use) of Initial Caps in words like earth, moon, and sun. In the long run, it doesn’t affect understanding; whether I write ”the President” or “the president”, you still know who I’m referring to. I write “the Northern Hemisphere”, just as you would (correctly) write “the West Coast”; it’s a proper name, and in English we capitalize proper names.

    When it comes to suns and moons it can get confusing. There are billions of suns out there; we have given names to more than 40 million of them, ranging from names given in other languages (e.g., Aldebaran), to less fanciful but more utilitarian names, such as HD 140913. The International Astronomical Union (IAU) has decreed that our sun is the only one without such a proper name, although historically and in poesy it’s been called by quite a few.

    Similarly for our moon. We’ve christened all of the other 182 moons in our solar system with names – ours is the only one we call the Moon.

    Since we capitalize the names of all the other heavenly bodies (even asteroids and comets, for pity’s sake), I feel we ought to show at least as much respect for the ones most important to us. The IAU agrees.

    So does Wikipedia. Their Manual of Style says: “The words sun, earth, moon and solar system are capitalized (as proper names) when used in an astronomical context to refer to a specific celestial body (our Sun, Earth, Moon and Solar System): The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System; The Moon orbits the Earth. They are not capitalized when used outside an astronomical context (The sky was clear and the sun felt warm), or when used in a general sense (Io is a moon of Jupiter).”

    Sometimes it’s a fine line. If I write “by the light of the silvery moon”, I won’t capitalize it, because I’m referring to an image of the celestial body, not the body itself. By contrast, if I write, “the light from the Sun reflects off the surface of the Moon,” I capitalize both, because I’m referring directly to the celestial bodies.

    If you inspect the archives of this blog, you will likely see many instances where I departed from this rule. We’ll call these oversights, and eventually I will correct them. Meanwhile, it’s an interesting challenge just to follow it in new writings. Are we having fun, yet?

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COPYRIGHT DISCLAIMER

Unless otherwise noted, this blog claims no credit for any images or compositions (e.g. art, songs, poetry) appearing on it. Copyrighted works remain the property of their respective owners; permission, attribution and/or links are provided when applicable or known. If there is content appearing on this blog that belongs to you and you do not wish for it to appear here, please leave a comment with your email address and a link to the item in question, and it will be promptly removed. Your comment will not be made public.

Posted in astronomy, Constellations, Folklore, moon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

August’s Lightning Full Moon

Welcome August Full Moon!

Welcome to Issue 8 of Volume IX of Earth, Moon and Stars!

IN THIS ISSUE
(click any of these section links that interest you)

INTRO

   In this crazy world, we all can use something to bring a sense of calm and ease. In addition to whatever works for you (music, a walk in nature, etc.), I find that looking up — at the moon, the stars — connects me with stillness and tranquility. (After all, the site where the first humans set foot on the Moon’s surface is called Tranquility Base.)

WHAT’S COOKIN’

FULLNESS
  The moon will become technically full Monday August 7 at 18:10 UTC, correspondingly earlier in time zones west of the Prime Meridian, later in time zones to the east. (See my December 2014 issue for some clarification about UTC and 24-hour time.)

  Because technical fullness will occur this time about six hours before midnight at the Prime Meridian, almost all places on the globe will see closest to a full moon Monday night. But since to an unaided eye she appears full 24 hours or so either side of technical fullness, you will be able to see what appears to be a full moon Sunday and Tuesday nights, as well. That gives you extra odds if you are dealing with potentially cloudy skies. Check Seasonal Calendar below for exact dates/times in some representative time zones, and how to find date and time of exact fullness in your time zone.

MOON NAMES
   With all the weather going on in North America, I thought “lightning” would be appropriate.  Find out the who and what in Moon Names.

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STARWATCH
   Just a quick mention of the Perseid meteors, which won’t be much of a show this year (despite the rampant rumors). See Starwatch .

SKYWATCH
   A final for viewing the  BIG SOLAR ECLIPSE on the 21st – even if you’re not on the direct path. Also some info on the partial lunar (moon) eclipse, that will not be visible from North America, but will be from most parts of South and East Asia, Europe, Africa and Australia.  Click Skywatch for details.

JUST SAYIN’
   My personal opinion section is taking a bye this month. Wishing you a happy summer!

ASTROLOGY
  Cristina in Zodiac Poetry and the astrologers at Dana’s Mooncircles have more personal insights into this Aquarius full moon. Drop in at Astrology to see what inspiration is waiting for you.

HUMOR
  Watch out for Planet Calvin. See Humor.

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MOON NAMES

Lightning Moon

MOON NAMES
   We’ve explored some great moon names for August in past issues: since 2011 we’ve featured Red & Sturgeon, Dog Days (2013 and 2015), Fruit & Ducks, and Berries & Cherries. If you are sweltering right now and could use a refreshing laugh, go visit the Yellow Dog Super Moon issue — does it for me every time.

   With all the wild weather and fires going on now, I thought the Neo-Pagan Lightning Moon was appropriate for this full moon. (I’ve also seen it as “Lightening”, which reader Marc tells me is the older Middle English spelling.)

   Did you know that Arizona has a monsoon season? Friends visiting there this week brought my attention to it. Turns out it’s not just Arizona, but southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Who knew? People living there, for sure, but not moi — until now. Another reason I love writing this blog. If you’re interested in more info on this, check out the Wikipedia article North American Monsoon.

The Lightning Moon looks down on peacefulness and destruction

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SEASONAL CALENDAR
Moon Dates and Times

August’s full moon        Monday Aug 7 18:10 UTC; 3:10 pm ADT; 2:10 pm EDT
.                                         Monday Aug 7 11:10 am PDT; 8:10 am HAST; 9:10 pm IDT
.                                         Tuesday Aug 8 2:10 am AWST/PHT; 4:10 am AEST

Partial Lunar Eclipse   Monday Aug 7 18:20 UTC; 3:20 pm ADT; 2:20 pm EDT
.                                         Monday Aug 7 11:20 am PDT; 8:20 am HAST; 9:20 pm IDT
.                                         Tuesday Aug 8 2:20 am AWST/PHT; 4:20 am AEST

                                         (See SKYWATCH for details)

THE BIG ECLIPSE      The total solar eclipse visible across the United States
.                                        Monday Aug 21 16:48 UTC.  Touches down in the north Pacific Ocean at local sunrise.
                                               (See SKYWATCH for details on when and how you can see it from where you are)

August’s new moon      Monday Aug 21 18:30 UTC; 3:30 pm ADT; 2:30 pm EDT; 11:30 am PDT
.                                        Monday Aug 21 8:30 am HAST; 9:30 pm IDT
.                                        Tuesday Aug 22 2:30 am AWST/PHT; 4:30 am AEST

September’s full moon    Wednesday Sept 6 07:02 UTC; 4:02 am ADT; 3:02 am EDT; 12:02 am PDT
.                                            Wednesday Sept 6 10:02 am IDT; 3:02 pm AWST/PHT; 5:02 pm AEST
.                                            Tuesday Sept 5 9:02 pm HAST

September”s new moon   Wednesday Sept 20 05:30 UTC; 2:30 am ADT; 1:30 am EDT
.                                             Wednesday Sept 20 8:30 am IDT; 1:30 pm AWST/PHT; 3:30 pm AEST
.                                             Tuesday Sept 19 7:30 pm HAST; 10:30 pm PDT

.                               Check Moon Giant to find Full Moon and New Moon times for your local time zone.

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STARWATCH

THE PERSEID METEORS

   It’s that time of year again for everyone’s favorite meteor show, the Perseids. Did you happen to hear the rumor about the “best Perseid shower in 96 years”? Unfortunately, it’s just that — a rumor. The timing this year is not ideal, as Ms. Luna will be washing out the night sky just when you want it to be dark for seeing meteor streaks. If you’re still interested, check out EarthSky’s article on the 2017 Perseids.

‘Skyfall’ — a 2015 composite by Matt Dieterich. (See EarthSky)

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SKYWATCH

AUGUST TOTAL ECLIPSE OF THE SUN: ACROSS THE U.S.!!

   Well, it’s almost here! The eclipse on the 21st will sweep a narrow path across the entire country—the first time this has happened since 1918. There will be another one in 2024, but it will not cut a swath across the entire United States, as this year’s will. 

  While eclipses of the moon can usually be seen from over a broad range of locations around the Earth, the shadow that the Moon casts during a solar eclipse is, by comparison, very brief (on the order of minutes when the sun is completely covered by the moon) and narrow (on the order of 100 miles wide). 

  If you don’t already have plans to be under the path, you will still be able to see a partial if you’re anywhere in the 48 contiguous United States. This map by the L.A. Times shows the shadow’s path, and will also give you the distance to the path from any location in the country.

   To see what the event will actually look like from any location, check out this interactive simulation created by Google and the University of California, Berkeley. Type in a location or zip code and you will see how the eclipse will look from there, along with the times during the 3-hour period when you can see it. For some maps, details and references, check out the Skywatch sections in my JanuaryMay and June issues. And for loads more details, this TimeandDate page.

Total Solar Eclipse Progression

   Just one word of caution — except under certain conditions, you risk blindness if you stare at the sun with your eyes unprotected. Just after sunrise and just before sunset are okay. Also, if you’re fortunate enough to see the sun totally eclipsed, that’s safe, too. But as soon as the edge of its disc starts to appear, you’ve got to use protection. Regular sunglasses are not good enough. See this space.com article, and/or do a search on how to watch the solar eclipse.

Total solar eclipse

Partial solar eclipse

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ECLIPSE OF THE MOON

   Have you noticed that a lunar eclipse always occurs about 2 weeks before or after a solar eclipse? This is because the lineup of the Moon’s orbit with the ecliptic that allows one, also remains around long enough to allow the other. (The ecliptic is so named because eclipses can occur only on this path that the sun appears to take.)

   The  lunar eclipse this time will occur at this full moon. (A lunar eclipse can occur only when the moon is full). This one will be just a partial, but will not be visible from the Americas. It will be visible from most parts of South and East Asia, Europe, Africa and Australia. More details, if you’re interested, at this TimeandDate page.

Partial Lunar Eclipse

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ASTROLOGY

Moon Travels Through the Zodiac

    Zipping Along. Unlike the Earth – which takes 365+ days to make a complete circuit through the zodiac – the moon takes just a month to complete an entire round. This means she spends on average only two and a half days in each zodiac sign.

   Opposition. Because at fullness the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun (opposition), it is in the zodiac sign that is opposite the sign that the sun is in. February’s Astrology section has a more detailed explanation.

Moon in Signs and Void of Course

   Technical astrologers call the times while Ms. Luna is in transition from one sign to the next “void of course”. This is considered to be a sort of neither-here-nor-there state, which many people feel as being unsettled or ungrounded. But as you might suspect, there are a number of ways of looking at and dealing with a VoC moon. Our most recent astrologer discovery Dana Gerhardt offers this interesting and encouraging outlook: “Fall into the Gap” on her Mooncircles website.   

   Each astrologer chooses their own method for calculating times of beginning and ending VoC. You can find interesting (though differing) VoC info and tables at Dr. Standley and at Moontracks.

   Referencing the Moontracks table, we find that Ms. Luna entered the sign of Capricorn on Friday (4th) at 00:36. She will begin exiting Capricorn — thus becoming VoC — on Sunday (6th) at 09:21, remaining void for less than three hours when she will enter Aquarius at 12:15, remaining there until well past fullness, leaving Aquarius — thus becoming void again — on Tuesday (8th) at 19:07. At 21:56 — less than three hours later — she will enter the next sign, Pisces.
(All times here are UTC~Coordinated Universal Time. See my December 2014 issue for some clarification about UTC and 24-hour time.)

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Cristina ~  

Full Moon in Aquarius
Out of the Blue

   Cristina (formerly known as Æterna) is a professional astrologer based in Italy, who also runs her own website Zodiac Poetry — “Stars – Heart – Soul”, where her emphasis is on introspection and emotions and her love of words and art. You can read about her in depth on her About Me page.

   In her piece this month, Cristina tells us that this coming month . . .

. . . looks remarkably intense, as in ‘shaky’, ‘metamorphic’, perhaps ‘life-altering’. For some of us, it might even mark a prominent demarcation, a point of no-return to certain things and situations that have outlived their usefulness.

She also notes that . . .

Eclipses tend to shake up the status quo and bring significant developments about major life events

 To see her full take — and the technicals behind it – click on over to Cristina’s full article: Full Moon in Aquarius “Out of the Blue”. Because her style is both pithy and sensitive, I recommend that you set aside some undistracted time to absorb and reflect. 

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Dana~  

Mooncircles

   Dana Gerhardt is an internationally respected astrologer and a popular columnist with The Mountain Astrologer since 1991. Her ongoing passions are the moon and living the intuitive life. You can read more about her at Dana’s bio. Her website, Mooncircles, is not just a blog by Dana – it is a professionally produced website where Dana features a number of astrologers writing on various approaches and aspects. You will definitely find something to capture your interest.

Mooncircles:
Aquarius Full Moon

   Rather than just one article, Dana’s website features a number of astrologers who offer a variety of personal viewpoints. (This personal approach is one of the big reasons I like her site.) Here are some brief teasers for her offerings at this full moon in Aquarius:

  Aquarius Lunar Eclipse: Radio Silence by April Elliott Kent
“I’m the molecular opposite of a summer camp girl. The few times I went away to camp, I was the miserable kid who counted the hours until it was time to leave.” [ . . . ]

  Aquarius Full Moon: The Call of Truth by Jessica Shepherd
“Last December I did something bold, and something absolutely terrifying. I told my husband I wanted to move.” [ . . . ]

  Aquarius Full Moon: Purification Ritual Mooncircles Archives
“[Fire and air signs] are great for purification rituals, [which are] especially powerful when the Moon is waning, a condition which begins with the Full Moon.” [ . . . ]

  3-Minute Moon Ritual by Dana Gerhardt
“Imagine above you the round glowing disc of the moon, bathing you.” [ . . . ]

   You can access each article by clicking on its link/thumbnail, or all of the above — and lots more — on the home page of Mooncircles.

Aquarius full moon

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HUMOR

Calvin and Hobbes . . .

   Planet Calvin in action . . .

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FROM ME TO YOU

    Thank you, dear reader, for visiting EM&S this “moonth”. I hope you liked it.

   Here’s a little bit about me and what this blog is about. I’ve been fascinated with astronomy ever since I learned to read. I’m also interested in how objects in the heavens influence people. In this blog I collect facts and folklore (mostly from the Web) about our moon and other sky phenomena.

   If you especially liked something you saw here, or would like to see something in particular covered in a future issue, or you have something interesting about the Earth, Moon, or Stars you would like to share, please feel free to leave a comment. I’m always interested in how folks who stop by here are moved/influenced/affected by what they encounter here. And please don’t be shy about sharing this post with friends if you like it!

   Note that I have a separate post called ARCHIVES which contains a list of all the titles I’ve posted since the inception of this blog. The titles are clickable of course. Easier and more informative than just the dates that appear in the right-side Archives column. (I’m slowly learning more things I can make WordPress do. There’s a lot there!)

   Until the full moon in September,
here’s wishing you and me and all of us
a month of centeredness and purification.

~ Moonlight to all!
Marty

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INTENTION FOR THIS EARTH, MOON AND STARS BLOG

   The Earth, Moon and Stars blog is published once each Full Moon with facts and lore about our moon and other sky phenomena that I find interesting. My wish is that you will have fun learning a bit more about heavenly objects, especially our one and only natural satellite and how all of us — people, animals, plants, water, even rocks — are affected and connected by her.

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MY PERSONAL TAKE ON ASTROLOGY

  Some folks have wondered why I have an astrology section in a blog that purports to be “science” oriented. I suppose I could cite ancient cultures in which astronomy and astrology were the domain of the same person. And that a broader way of understanding the aim of science is to expand knowledge (the word science being derived from the Latin word  scīre “to know”). My own sense is that while we humans live in a material world that runs by certain rules of physics, we each experience our lives in this world subjectively. It’s what makes us similar and at the same time unique.
   How much do celestial bodies influence our lives? Certainly the Sun and the Moon have noticeable gravitational effects on water and even rocks. Electromagnetic and particle radiation from the Sun has both obvious and subtle effects on just about everything on this planet. Even moonlight affects plants and animals.  I do not claim to know if or how much these and other celestial bodies affect us directly, but I like the wisdom, warmth and humanness that the astrologers I feature express in their writing, and believe that including them not only expands my potential audience, but also exposes folks to ways of thinking about their own lives that they might not have otherwise considered. Let me know your take on this. I won’t make your comment public if you ask me not to.

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A NOTE ON WRITING STYLE

    A few detail-oriented folks have inquired about my use (or mis-use) of Initial Caps in words like earth, moon, and sun. In the long run, it doesn’t affect understanding; whether I write ”the President” or “the president”, you still know who I’m referring to. I write “the Northern Hemisphere”, just as you would (correctly) write “the West Coast”; it’s a proper name, and in English we capitalize proper names.

    When it comes to suns and moons it can get confusing. There are billions of suns out there; we have given names to more than 40 million of them, ranging from names given in other languages (e.g., Aldebaran), to less fanciful but more utilitarian names, such as HD 140913. The International Astronomical Union (IAU) has decreed that our sun is the only one without such a proper name, although historically and in poesy it’s been called by quite a few.

    Similarly for our moon. We’ve christened all of the other 182 moons in our solar system with names – ours is the only one we call the Moon.

    Since we capitalize the names of all the other heavenly bodies (even asteroids and comets, for pity’s sake), I feel we ought to show at least as much respect for the ones most important to us. The IAU agrees.

    So does Wikipedia. Their Manual of Style says: “The words sun, earth, moon and solar system are capitalized (as proper names) when used in an astronomical context to refer to a specific celestial body (our Sun, Earth, Moon and Solar System): The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System; The Moon orbits the Earth. They are not capitalized when used outside an astronomical context (The sky was clear and the sun felt warm), or when used in a general sense (Io is a moon of Jupiter).”

    Sometimes it’s a fine line. If I write “by the light of the silvery moon”, I won’t capitalize it, because I’m referring to an image of the celestial body, not the body itself. By contrast, if I write, “the light from the Sun reflects off the surface of the Moon,” I capitalize both, because I’m referring directly to the celestial bodies.

    If you inspect the archives of this blog, you will likely see many instances where I departed from this rule. We’ll call these oversights, and eventually I will correct them. Meanwhile, it’s an interesting challenge just to follow it in new writings. Are we having fun, yet?

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COPYRIGHT DISCLAIMER

Unless otherwise noted, this blog claims no credit for any images or compositions (e.g. art, songs, poetry) appearing on it. Copyrighted works remain the property of their respective owners; permission, attribution and/or links are provided when applicable or known. If there is content appearing on this blog that belongs to you and you do not wish for it to appear here, please leave a comment with your email address and a link to the item in question, and it will be promptly removed. Your comment will not be made public.

Posted in astronomy, Constellations, Folklore, moon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

July’s Raspberry Moon

Welcome July Full Moon!

Welcome to Issue 7 of Volume IX of Earth, Moon and Stars!

IN THIS ISSUE
(click any of these section links that interest you)

INTRO

   Amidst the hustle and tensions of daily life, I hope you pause – if just for a moment – and look up at the full moon. See what is there for you – perhaps a glimpse into history or connection with the vastness of the universe . . . hopefully tranquility of some sort. (After all, the site where the first humans set foot on the Moon’s surface is called Tranquility Base.)

WHAT’S COOKIN’

FULLNESS
  The moon will become technically full Sunday July 9 at 04:07 UTC, correspondingly earlier in time zones west of the Prime Meridian, later in time zones to the east. (See my December 2014 issue for some clarification about UTC and 24-hour time.)

  Because technical fullness will occur this time a few hours after midnight at the Prime Meridian – as it did last October – Ms. Luna will appear fullest Saturday night to folks west of the Middle East (which will be on the cusp) to the International Date Line. Places east of the cusp to the Date Line will see maximum fullness on Sunday night. But since to an unaided eye she will appear full 24 hours or so either side of technical fullness, you will be able to see what appears to be a full moon three nights in a row. Check Seasonal Calendar below for exact dates/times in some representative time zones, and how to find date and time of exact fullness in your time zone.

MOON NAMES
   Fruit season at its peak up here in the N Hemis. Find out what’s behind “raspberry” in Moon Names.

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STARWATCH
   Out after dark on these warm summer evenings, I’m getting back into looking at stars and constellations. Looming huge and easily recognizable right now is amazing Scorpius, with its show-off star Antares. Catch it when the sky is dark as the moon wanes. Starwatch for details.

SKYWATCH
   Just another reminder about the  BIG SOLAR ECLIPSE coming in August!
Click Skywatch.

JUST SAYIN’
   It’s the first anniversary of my opinion section in this blog! I didn’t know what I was going to feature this month until I heard this song on Pandora. Check out Just Sayin’.

ASTROLOGY
  Cristina in Zodiac Poetry and the astrologers at Dana’s Mooncircles have more personal insights into this Capricorn full moon. Drop in at Astrology to see what inspiration is waiting for you.

HUMOR
  Calvin and Hobbes attempt environmental activism. See Humor.

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MOON NAMES

Raspberry Moon

MOON NAMES
   July moon names have an interesting history on this blog. Since 2011 we’ve featured Thunder, Horse, Mead, Peach/Thunder, Hay, and Corn/Squash. And now, just when I thought there would be no more fruit moons, my go-to site for indigenous peoples American Indian Moons tells me that Raspberry was the name used by the Shawnee for the June moon, and by the Ojibwe/Chippewa (Great Lakes and Canada) who called the July moon “aabita-niibino-giizis”. Bonus! (Remember, they were using the moon to demarcate seasons; they weren’t using our Western calendar at the time.)

Raspberry Moon

   But wait! That’s not all . . . A simple search turned up the raspberry moon caladium with its numerous varieties. Who knew? Certainly not moi – another reason I love doing this blog . . .

Raspberry Moon Caladiums
(Flintwood Farms)

Raspberry Moon Caladium Sweethearts
(Miss Smarty Plants)

 

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SEASONAL CALENDAR
Moon Dates and Times

 July’s full moon             Sunday July 9 04:07 UTC; 1:07 am ADT; 2:07 am EDT
.                                          Sunday July 9 7:07 am IDT; 12:07 pm AWST/PHT; 2:07 pm AEST
.                                          Saturday July 8 9:07 pm PDT; 6:07 pm HAST

July’s new moon            Sunday July 23 09:45 UTC; 6:45 am ADT; 5:45 am EDT; 2:45 am PDT
.                                         Sunday July 23 12:45 pm IDT; 5:45 pm AWST/PHT; 7:45 pm AEST
.                                         Saturday July 22 11:45 pm HAST

August’s full moon        Monday Aug 7 18:10 UTC; 3:10 pm ADT; 2:10 pm EDT
.                                         Monday Aug 7  11:10 am PDT; 8:10 am HAST; 9:10 pm IDT
.                                         Tuesday Aug 8 2:10 am AWST/PHT; 4:10 am AEST

THE BIG ECLIPSE      The total solar eclipse visible across the United States
.                                        Monday Aug 21 16:48 UTC.  Touches down in the north Pacific Ocean at local sunrise.
                                               (See SKYWATCH)

August’s new moon      Monday Aug 21 18:30 UTC; 3:30 pm ADT; 2:30 pm EDT; 11:30 am PDT
.                                        Monday Aug 21 8:30 am HAST; 9:30 pm IDT
.                                        Tuesday Aug 22 2:30 am AWST/PHT; 4:30 am AEST

.                               Check Moon Giant to find Full Moon and New Moon times for your local time zone.

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STARWATCH

SCINTILLATING ANTARES IN SCORPIUS

   One of the main reasons I began writing about the Moon and stars (back in 2009, when it began as a simple email to friends) was for me: I’ve been fascinated by what’s up there since a little kid. Even though I’ve never owned a telescope, I still want to learn more.

  So a couple of weeks ago I was out for a late night jog. The sky was clear and, being right around the new moon, was very dark. I looked up and there was this very large and discernible “J”- shaped constellation; I realized right away it had to be the scorpion, Scorpius.  I just love the idea that people thousands of years ago looked up and saw the same shape. And they invented stories to go with it.

Scorpius in the night sky (EarthSky)

   But wait — it gets even better. Following the “J” from its stinger (at the bottom) to the top (its claws), I saw this one very red star — not twinkling, but flashing! “Naw,” I thought, “that has to be a plane or a helicopter.” But it didn’t move; a half hour later it was still there, flashing red.

   Yes, it was Antares. Antares means the “rival of Mars”, so called because of its ruddy color (it’s a red giant) and its relative brightness. For the same reasons, it is also known as the Scorpion’s Heart. (Antares doesn’t actually flash; that was just Earth’s atmosphere. But it is very definitely red.)

   Wait for a couple of days after the full moon; since it will rise about 45 minutes later each night, you will have plenty of dark night opportunities for the next two weeks. For more on Scorpius constellation and Scorpio sign, see my July ’14 and November ’14 issues. And for a lot more interesting astronomy details, see EarthSky’s articles on Scorpius and Antares.

Artistic Recreation of the Antares System
(Don Dixon at Los Colores de la Noche)

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SKYWATCH

AUGUST TOTAL ECLIPSE OF THE SUN: ACROSS THE U.S.!!

   Okay – who hasn’t heard about the coming “eclipse across America”? You can’t say we didn’t warn ya . . . The eclipse this summer will sweep a narrow path across the entire country—the first time this has happened since 1918. 

  While eclipses of the moon can usually be seen from over a broad range of locations around the Earth, the shadow that the Moon casts during a solar eclipse is, by comparison, very brief (on the order of minutes) and narrow (on the order of 100 miles wide). August 21 is getting closer fast, so if you feel this is something you want to do, the time is now to get your plans finalized if you want to be in the shadow’s path. For details and references, check out the Skywatch sections in my recent May and June issues. 

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JUST SAYIN’

Gettin’ My Irish On

   Listening the other night to the Irish ballad station I had just created on Pandora, I heard this song with “moon” in its title that I didn’t didn’t recognize. Just a little research, and I knew it was going into this issue.

The Rising of the Moon (ballad)

   “The Rising of the Moon” is an Irish ballad recounting a battle between the United Irishmen and the British Army during the Irish Rebellion of 1798. This song has been in circulation since around 1865.  Click the photo of the Pikeman monument to hear Na Casaidigh (The Cassidys) sing this song on YouTube. (Be patient with the opening of the video; the song starts at 0:18.)

   For a more energetic rendition, try this performance by the High Kings.

   Here is one stanza of this song:

Oh then, tell me Seán O’Farrell, tell me why you hurry so?
“Hush a bhuachaill, hush and listen”, and his cheeks were all aglow,
“I bear orders from the captain:- get you ready quick and soon
For the pikes must be together by the rising of the moon.”

   As with most Irish ballads, this song is rich and emotional. You can see the full lyrics in the description section beneath the YouTube video or at this Google Play page.

    Staying true to the course I laid out when I began this section, I’m not going to take sides or get into the politics of it. What I want to highlight is the same theme I’ve touted all along – that with all the battles and raging emotions we experience “down here”, it is possible to rise above it and look down from the Moon’s calming perspective. I recommend trying this sometime.

Other “Rising of the Moon” Works

The Wikipedia disambiguation page for Rising of the Moon lists the following interesting similarly-themed works:

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ASTROLOGY

Moon Travels Through the Zodiac

    Zipping Along. Unlike the Earth – which takes 365+ days to make a complete circuit through the zodiac – the moon takes just a month to complete an entire round. This means she spends on average only two and a half days in each zodiac sign.

   Opposition. Because at fullness the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun (opposition), it is in the zodiac sign that is opposite the sign that the sun is in. February’s Astrology section has a more detailed explanation.

Moon in Signs and Void of Course

   Technical astrologers call the times while Ms. Luna is in transition from one sign to the next “void of course”. This is considered to be a sort of neither-here-nor-there state, which many people feel as being unsettled or ungrounded. But as you might suspect, there are a number of ways of looking at and dealing with a VoC moon. Our most recent astrologer discovery Dana Gerhardt offers this interesting and encouraging outlook: “Fall into the Gap” on her Mooncircles website.   

   Each astrologer chooses their own method for calculating times of beginning and ending VoC. You can find interesting (though differing) VoC info and tables at Dr. Standley and at Moontracks.

   Referencing the Moontracks table, we find that Ms. Luna entered the sign of Capricorn on Friday (7th) at 17:44. She will remain in Capricorn well past fullness and will begin exiting Capricorn — thus becoming VoC — on Monday (10th) at 02:12. She will remain void for only about three hours when she will enter the next sign, Aquarius, at 05:35. (All times here are UTC~Coordinated Universal Time.)

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Cristina ~  

Photography by Brooke Shaden

Full Moon in Capricorn
Ask the Mountains

   Cristina (formerly known as Æterna) is a professional astrologer based in Italy, who also runs her own website Zodiac Poetry — “Stars – Heart – Soul”, where her emphasis is on introspection and emotions and her love of words and art. You can read about her in depth on her About Me page.

   In her piece this month, Cristina says that the intensity of this full moon has been building up for quite some time, and . . .

The places illuminated by a Full Moon in Capricorn, the fearless, far-seeing sign of the goat, are likely to be already in the spotlight; simply because everything we strive to reach lies on the metaphorical heights symbolized by Capricorn, on the other side of fear, doubt, negligence. Thus, a Full Moon in Capricorn illuminates the area of our chart where we can reap what we have sown.

    To see what she’s getting at – and for as little or as much insight and detail as you desire – click on over to Cristina’s full article: Full Moon in Capricorn “Ask the Mountains”. Because her style is both pithy and sensitive, I recommend that you set aside some undistracted time to absorb and reflect. 

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Dana~  

Mooncircles

   Dana Gerhardt is an internationally respected astrologer and a popular columnist with The Mountain Astrologer since 1991. Her ongoing passions are the moon and living the intuitive life. You can read more about her at Dana’s bio. Her website, Mooncircles, is not just a blog by Dana – it is a professionally produced website where Dana features a number of astrologers writing on various approaches and aspects. You will definitely find something to capture your interest.

Mooncircles:
Capricorn Full Moon

   Rather than just one article, Dana’s website features a number of astrologers who offer a variety of personal viewpoints. (This personal approach is one of the big reasons I like her site.) Here are some brief teasers for her offerings at this full moon in Capricorn:

  Capricorn Full Moon: Nobody’s Child by April Elliott Kent
“We are tough with each other these days, because the world is tough, and so many of us are nobody’s children, with no soft place to turn to when we have failed or fallen.”

  Capricorn Full Moon: Time for Kindness by Jessica Shepherd
“I bumped my elbow walking out of my office this morning. It hurt.”

  Your most vulnerable month by Dana Gerhardt
“It happens for a few weeks, same time every year. You hit a slump. The wind goes out of your sails and doing what’s usual feels oddly overwhelming.”

  3-Minute Moon Ritual by Dana Gerhardt
“Imagine above you the round glowing disc of the moon, bathing you…”

 You can access each article by clicking on its link, or all of the above — plus more articles and rituals — on the home page of Mooncircles.

Capricorn Full Moon

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HUMOR

Calvin and Hobbes . . .

   . . . houses vs. trees:

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FROM ME TO YOU

    Thank you, dear reader, for visiting EM&S this “moonth”. I hope you liked it.

   Here’s a little bit about me and what this blog is about. I’ve been fascinated with astronomy ever since I learned to read. I’m also interested in how objects in the heavens influence people. In this blog I collect facts and folklore (mostly from the Web) about our moon and other sky phenomena.

   If you especially liked something you saw here, or would like to see something in particular covered in a future issue, or you have something interesting about the Earth, Moon, or Stars you would like to share, please feel free to leave a comment. I’m always interested in how folks who stop by here are moved/influenced/affected by what they encounter here. And please don’t be shy about sharing this post with friends if you like it!

   Note that I have a separate post called ARCHIVES which contains a list of all the titles I’ve posted since the inception of this blog. The titles are clickable of course. Easier and more informative than just the dates that appear in the right-side Archives column. (I’m slowly learning more things I can make WordPress do. There’s a lot there!)

   Until the full moon in August,
here’s wishing you and me and all of us
a month of kindness to ourselves and others.

~ Moonlight to all!
Marty

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INTENTION FOR THIS EARTH, MOON AND STARS BLOG

   The Earth, Moon and Stars blog is published once each Full Moon with facts and lore about our moon and other sky phenomena that I find interesting. My wish is that you will have fun learning a bit more about heavenly objects, especially our one and only natural satellite and how all of us — people, animals, plants, water, even rocks — are affected and connected by her.

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MY PERSONAL TAKE ON ASTROLOGY

  Some folks have wondered why I have an astrology section in a blog that purports to be “science” oriented. I suppose I could cite ancient cultures in which astronomy and astrology were the domain of the same person. And that a broader way of understanding the aim of science is to expand knowledge (the word science being derived from the Latin word  scīre “to know”). My own sense is that while we humans live in a material world that runs by certain rules of physics, we each experience our lives in this world subjectively. It’s what makes us similar and at the same time unique.
   How much do celestial bodies influence our lives? Certainly the Sun and the Moon have noticeable gravitational effects on water and even rocks. Electromagnetic and particle radiation from the Sun has both obvious and subtle effects on just about everything on this planet. Even moonlight affects plants and animals.  I do not claim to know if or how much these and other celestial bodies affect us directly, but I like the wisdom, warmth and humanness that the astrologers I feature express in their writing, and believe that including them not only expands my potential audience, but also exposes folks to ways of thinking about their own lives that they might not have otherwise considered. Let me know your take on this. I won’t make your comment public if you ask me not to.

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A NOTE ON WRITING STYLE

    A few detail-oriented folks have inquired about my use (or mis-use) of Initial Caps in words like earth, moon, and sun. In the long run, it doesn’t affect understanding; whether I write ”the President” or “the president”, you still know who I’m referring to. I write “the Northern Hemisphere”, just as you would (correctly) write “the West Coast”; it’s a proper name, and in English we capitalize proper names.

    When it comes to suns and moons it can get confusing. There are billions of suns out there; we have given names to more than 40 million of them, ranging from names given in other languages (e.g., Aldebaran), to less fanciful but more utilitarian names, such as HD 140913. The International Astronomical Union (IAU) has decreed that our sun is the only one without such a proper name, although historically and in poesy it’s been called by quite a few.

    Similarly for our moon. We’ve christened all of the other 182 moons in our solar system with names – ours is the only one we call the Moon.

    Since we capitalize the names of all the other heavenly bodies (even asteroids and comets, for pity’s sake), I feel we ought to show at least as much respect for the ones most important to us. The IAU agrees.

    So does Wikipedia. Their Manual of Style says: “The words sun, earth, moon and solar system are capitalized (as proper names) when used in an astronomical context to refer to a specific celestial body (our Sun, Earth, Moon and Solar System): The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System; The Moon orbits the Earth. They are not capitalized when used outside an astronomical context (The sky was clear and the sun felt warm), or when used in a general sense (Io is a moon of Jupiter).”

    Sometimes it’s a fine line. If I write “by the light of the silvery moon”, I won’t capitalize it, because I’m referring to an image of the celestial body, not the body itself. By contrast, if I write, “the light from the Sun reflects off the surface of the Moon,” I capitalize both, because I’m referring directly to the celestial bodies.

    If you inspect the archives of this blog, you will likely see many instances where I departed from this rule. We’ll call these oversights, and eventually I will correct them. Meanwhile, it’s an interesting challenge just to follow it in new writings. Are we having fun, yet?

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COPYRIGHT DISCLAIMER

Unless otherwise noted, this blog claims no credit for any images or compositions (e.g. art, songs, poetry) appearing on it. Copyrighted works remain the property of their respective owners; permission, attribution and/or links are provided when applicable or known. If there is content appearing on this blog that belongs to you and you do not wish for it to appear here, please leave a comment with your email address and a link to the item in question, and it will be promptly removed. Your comment will not be made public.

Posted in astronomy, Constellations, Folklore, moon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

June’s Peachy Full Moon

Welcome June Full Moon!

Welcome to Issue 6 of Volume IX of Earth, Moon and Stars!

IN THIS ISSUE
(click any of these section links)

INTRO

   As the lunacy and lunatics in this world are tending to dominate the news – and our consciousnesses – I hope this brief sojourn into the heavens encourages you to turn away briefly from the TV and your phone and look up. More of my personal opinions, if you’re interested, in my Just Sayin’ section.

   If you’re new here and would like to learn first more about what we’re up to, click on Me to You to jump to my Intro section. (There’s a link there that will take you back to the above table of contents when you are ready.)

Full moon over Devil’s Chair, illuminated by setting sun (2016 ~Andrew F Peters)

   This photo might not seem remarkable to you at first glance, perhaps because there are so many fantasy manipulated photos of the moon out there. But Andrew Peters took this rare once-in-a-lifetime unretouched photo in the English Shropshire hills in the few moments when the full moon had just risen before the sun had set. This allowed the purple heather – which is in bloom for only four weeks a year – to be shown illuminated in sunset light. You can read more about this photo in this Daily Express article.

WHAT’S COOKIN’

FULLNESS
  The moon will become technically full Friday June 9 at 13:10 UTC, correspondingly earlier in time zones west of the Prime Meridian, later in time zones to the east. (See my December 2014 issue for some clarification about UTC and 24-hour time.)

  Because technical fullness will occur this time in the middle of the day at the Prime Meridian – as it did last November – the cusp will again fall around Iceland’s meridian, and thus Ms. Luna will appear there equally full both Thursday and Friday nights. Further west to the International Date Line will see closer to maximum fullness on Thursday night, while Friday night will favor folks east of the cusp. But note that to an unaided eye she will appear full 24 hours or so either side of technical fullness, so you will be able to see what appears to be a full moon three nights in a row. Check Seasonal Calendar below for exact times in some representative time zones, and how to find exact fullness time in your time zone.

MOON NAMES
   It’s fruit season up here in the N Hemis. Find out who called the June moon a “peach” in Moon Names.

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Full Moon Cityscape (watercolor and pastel ©2014 by Carol Engles)

SEASONINGS
   The June Solstice in Seasonings.

CELEBRATIONS
   When is Midsummer, and what the heck is it anyway? And what is Kupala? Check out Celebrations for details and neat pics.

SKYWATCH
   The BIG ECLIPSE is coming! We’re giving you another heads up to get ready for August! Annd – to commemorate this event, the USPS has issued a new kind of touch-sensitive stamp. Click Skywatch for the lowdown.

JUST SAYIN’
   If you’ve been following my opinion section since its inception last July, you’ve seen that I’ve begun to head toward focusing on the future of the Earth. Last month I went back to 1970 for an environmental song. This month it’s a clever and entertaining 2012 rendition of a 1962 hippies anthem. For some uplifting fun, go to Just Sayin’.

ASTROLOGY
  Cristina in Zodiac Poetry and the astrologers at Dana’s Mooncircles give us top-level insights into this Sagittarius full moon. Head over to Astrology to see what inspiration they’ve got for you.

HUMOR
  Continuing with Calvin and Hobbes in our Humor section, our boys not so humorously bemoan “progress”.

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MOON NAMES

Peach Moon

MOON NAMES
   When I checked my back issues, I was surprised to find that I’ve featured only four different names for the June moon: Lotus, Horse, Strawberry (2014 and 2016), and Watermelon. So I figured why break a winning streak – let’s do another fruit! (Okay – for you purists out there, it turns out none of the above is a fruit, but that’s not going to stop me from naming this moon, or from diving deliciously into another watermelon.)

   According to one of my favorite moon name sites, American Indian Moons, the Choctaw named the full moon if it came in early June Hash Takkon, or “moon of peach“.

Peach Moon ©2011 by Medi Belortaja

(To be fair, Mr. Belortaja made this “moon-toon” based on a photograph of an orange moon that is all over the Internet. But I love it as it is in keeping with the photos of strawberry and watermelon moons that we’ve featured in the past.)

   I was pulled to peach moon right away because it reminded me of how the mother of my children would always bake a delicious peach pie at this time of year. And peaches are beginning to show up in the markets, just in time for the summer picnic season up here in the Northern Hemisphere, so let’s par-tay!

I see that I did include “peaches” in the title of my July ’14 issue. But the derivation of this name is different, I’m not sharing it with another name, and besides, I like peaches!

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SEASONAL CALENDAR
Moon Dates and Times

June’s full moon       Friday June 9 13:10 UTC; 10:10 am ADT; 9:10 am EDT; 6:10 am PDT; 3:10 am HAST
.                                     Friday June 9 4:10 pm IDT; 9:10 pm AWST/PHT; 11:10 pm AEST

June solstice              Wednesday June 21 04:24 UTC; 7:24 am IDT; 12:24 pm AWST/PHT;  2:24 pm AEST
.                                     Wednesday June 21 1:24 am ADT; 12:24 am EDT
.                                     Tuesday June 20 9:24 pm PDT; 6:24 pm HAST

June’s new moon     Saturday June 24 02:31 UTC; 5:31 am IDT; 10:31 am AWST/PHT; 12:31 pm AEST
.                                     Friday June 23 11:31 pm ADT; 10:31 pm EDT; 7:31 pm PDT; 4:31 pm HAST

July’s full moon       Sunday July 9 04:07 UTC; 1:07 am ADT; 2:07 am EDT
.                                    Sunday July 9 7:07 am IDT; 12:07 pm AWST/PHT; 2:07 pm AEST
.                                    Saturday July 8 9:07 pm PDT; 6:07 pm HAST

July’s new moon     Sunday July 23 09:45 UTC; 6:45 am ADT; 5:45 am EDT; 2:45 am PDT
.                                    Sunday July 23 12:45 pm IDT; 5:45 pm AWST/PHT; 7:45 pm AEST
.                                    Saturday July 22 11:45 pm HAST

.                               Check Moon Giant to find Full Moon and New Moon times for your local time zone.

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SEASONINGS

June Solstice and Midsummer

WHEN IS THE SOLSTICE
.   Wednesday the 21st or Tuesday the 20th (depending on where you are … see dates and exact times above) will mark the June solstice (summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere, winter solstice in the Southern Hemisphere) — the time when the sun “stops” in its apparent movement northward and then begins moving south. (Remember – solstice means “sun standing still”.)

MIDSUMMER
.   How can the solstice be the middle of summer, when everyone knows that the solstice marks the beginning of summer, right? Well, hang onto your sombrero — you shouldn’t be surprised to learn that, like most confluences of man, nature, and astronomy, there isn’t just one answer . . . nor are they all simple.

   It turns out that people have been talking about the weather and naming seasons for a lonnng time . . . and understandably so, since from the time that our ancestors decided to grow food rather than gather it, they needed some way to know when to plant. Today you can find places where people have carved up the year into two, four, or even six seasons.

Seasons diagram (NOAA)

   The only reason we are even aware of seasons is because of the Earth’s tilt, causing a smooth cycle of warming and cooling as we whip around the Sun. These meteorological trends are gradual — not abruptly stopping or starting on a particular day. But to be able to talk about them, people have demarcated various times in the year to begin a season.

.   Astronomically speaking, one system of reckoning uses the two equinoxes and the two solstices to demarcate four seasons. However, some cultures recognize only two seasons: summer (warm) and winter (not so warm). That’s why Midsummer (as in Shakespeare’s famous “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”) was at the solstice: it was midway between the beginning of summer (the vernal equinox) and the beginning of winter (the autumnal equinox).

Oberon, Titania and Puck with Fairies Dancing (William Blake, c. 1786)

     For more details on solstices, along with a neat diagram, check out my June 2014 post “Strawberry Moon“.

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SUN-RELATED CELEBRATIONS

MIDSUMMER CELEBRATIONS

   Midsummer is celebrated in various cultures either on or near the summer solstice. It’s a big deal in all northern European countries, because the longest day of the year (“midnight sun” above the Arctic Circle) signals that the days will now become shorter – so “eat, drink and be merry while ye may!”

   Swedes celebrate with three days of dancing, folk music and wreath making, starting on Midsummer’s Eve, always the third Friday in June (June 23 this year).

Midsummer Dancing in Sweden

   Ukrainians continue a long tradition by celebrating Ivan Kupala Day (also called “Feast of St. John the Baptist”) this year celebrating midsummer beginning on the night of July 6 (over two weeks after the actual solstice, but who’s counting?). For the very interesting history behind this holiday, see the Wikipedia article Kupala Night.

Kupala Night

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SKYWATCH

AUGUST TOTAL ECLIPSE OF THE SUN: ACROSS THE U.S.!!

   Okay – who hasn’t heard about the coming “eclipse across America”? You can’t say we didn’t warn ya . . . The eclipse this summer will sweep a narrow path across the entire country—the first time this has happened since 1918. 

  While eclipses of the moon can usually be seen from over a broad range of locations around the Earth, the shadow that the Moon casts during a solar eclipse is, by comparison, very brief (on the order of minutes) and narrow (on the order of 100 miles wide). August 21 is getting closer fast, so if you feel this is something you want to do, the time is now to get your plans finalized if you want to be in the shadow’s path.

Total Solar Eclipse (Wikipedia)


    To be real about this, I note here that while the whole event — beginning with the first incursion of the new moon covering the sun — may take over two hours, even if you are standing in the center of the shadow’s path in an ideal location, the time that the image of the sun will be totally covered by the moon will be only a couple of minutes! Is it worth it? It will be to some people, many of whom will be traveling from distant parts of the world to view the spectacle in person.
  But this may not be for everyone; I’ve been directly under two in my lifetime and I don’t need to see another one. But I have to admit that it’s pretty eerie to see complete darkness drop suddenly, and to hear the birds stop their singing – probably wondering what the &*? is going on. For detailed data on hundreds of locations along the shadow’s path, see Eclipse-2017. And for a very helpful interactive map that will show you exact times for any location under the path, visit Xavier Jubier’s Interactive Google Map.
  If you aren’t near the shadow’s path, you can still watch live streaming videos of the event. Check this NASA site for details. See also my January issue for more links and details, and Wikipedia’s comprehensive article. And see The Weather Channel’s page with animation of the shadow and recommendations for five places to consider traveling to. A web search for “Solar Eclipse 2017” will get you a plethora of hits.

USPS ISSUES TOUCH-SENSITIVE ECLIPSE STAMP

   Abra cadabra! ~ On June 20 the US Postal Service will release a first-of-its-kind stamp that changes when you touch it. The Total Eclipse of the Sun Forever stamp, which commemorates the August 21 eclipse, transforms into an image of the Moon from the heat of your finger. The public is asked to share the news on social media using the hashtag #EclipseStamps. (Taken from USPS website.) (Many thanks to reader Ima Lou for the heads-up on this.)

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JUST SAYIN’

A New Thread

   This issue marks the twelfth since last July when I began including this personal opinion section. I created it to give me a soap box to spout off from to offer a more unifying perspective on the troubles and pain we humans continue to inflict on each other on this paradise planet. Many poets have expressed how calming the moon can be . . . due ~ among other things ~ to her perspective from above, her constant blessing of us while we deal with chaos below, and especially to her silence. (See Just Sayin’ in last July’s issue for my expansion on this point of view.)

Earth and Moon from space

   This perspective sees all of us as equal passengers on this bright blue marble. You can check out previous issues back to July ’16 over there in the archives on the right to hear songs I’ve found expressing this idea in a variety of styles.

   In April’s issue I veered a bit and featured a song from 1946 on the danger of the atom bomb. Last month I featured Joni Mitchell singing her plaint about what many people call “progress”.

  This month’s pick may not shout “environment”, but it is related ecological commentary. You probably know the song “Little Boxes”, written in 1962 by Malvina Reynolds and popularized by her friend Pete Seeger in 1963, but you probably haven’t heard it done quite like this.

    Walk Off the Earth is one of my favorite groups, and I wanted to introduce you to them in case you haven’t been already. Besides being highly creative and entertaining, they do have the word “Earth” in their name, which pushes them even higher in the rankings for Earth, Moon and Stars.

    “Little Boxes” became quite popular in the ’60s as an anthem for the hippie anti-establishment movement, highlighting a cultural sellout on important values. Here is a sample of Malvina’s lyrics:

Little boxes on the hillside
There’s a pink one and a green one
And a blue one and a yellow one
And they’re all made out of ticky-tacky
And they all look just the same.

   You can find the complete lyrics at this Genius page.

    Click the disc cover image below to watch and listen to WOTE perform their quite hilarious 2012 version on YouTube.

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ASTROLOGY

Moon Travels Through the Zodiac

    Zipping Along. Unlike the Earth – which takes 365+ days to make a complete circuit through the zodiac – the moon takes just a month to complete an entire round. This means she spends on average only two and a half days in each zodiac sign.

   Opposition. Because at fullness the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun (opposition), it is in the zodiac sign that is opposite the sign that the sun is in. February’s Astrology section has a more detailed explanation.

Moon in Signs and Void of Course

   Technical astrologers call the times while Ms. Luna is in transition from one sign to the next “void of course”. This is considered to be a sort of neither-here-nor-there state, which many people feel as being unsettled or ungrounded. But as you might suspect, there are a number of ways of looking at and dealing with a VoC moon. Our most recent astrologer discovery Dana Gerhardt offers this interesting and encouraging outlook: “Fall into the Gap” on her Mooncircles website.   

   Each astrologer chooses their own method for calculating times of beginning and ending VoC. You can find interesting (though differing) VoC info and tables at Dr. Standley and at Moontracks.

   Referencing the Moontracks table, we find that Ms. Luna entered the sign of Sagittarius on Wednesday (7th) at 22:59. She will remain in Sagittarius well past fullness and will begin exiting Sagittarius — thus becoming VoC — on Saturday (10th) at 06:20. She will remain void for only about five hours when she will enter the next sign, Capricorn, at 11:36. (All times here are UTC~Coordinated Universal Time.)

Sagittarius Full Moon

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Cristina ~  

Full Moon in Sagittarius
“The Quest for Truth”

   Cristina (formerly known as Æterna) is a professional astrologer based in Italy, who also runs her own website Zodiac Poetry — “Stars – Heart – Soul”, where her emphasis is on introspection and emotions and her love of words and art. You can read about her in depth on her About Me page.

   To tell you the truth, Cristina’s title for her full moon in Sagittarius article is actually “The Eyes of Truth”. But she talks a lot about the hero’s quest, so I altered my title above to reflect that. In her article, Cristina offers us . . .

. . . this Full Moon represents a glimpse of Truth, a revealing push further into the unknown; it’s one or several missing pieces of the broader picture of our lives coming into focus.
[and]
I like to think of a Sagittarius plenilune as a moment of epiphany – the disclosure of a revelation, the unfolding of a vision, the finishing line of a lengthy road of trials that previously led us into unfamiliar territory, in search of clarity and emotional Truth.

   I learned a new word ~ plenilune! I guess I could figure it out: pleni ~ a lot of, and lune, the moon, of course. But I had to look it up: merriam-webster.com has a brief entry (dictionary.com doesn’t even list it). Turns out it came straight from the Latin plenilunium (literally “full moon”) directly into Middle English, apparently bypassing French altogether.
   To see what she’s getting at – and for as little or as much insight and detail as you desire – click on over to Cristina’s full article: Full Moon in Sagittarius – The Eyes of Truth. Because her style is both pithy and sensitive, I recommend that you set aside some undistracted time to absorb and reflect. 

Sagittarius full moon (Tanaaz at Forever Conscious)

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Dana~  

Mooncircles

   Dana Gerhardt is an internationally respected astrologer and a popular columnist with The Mountain Astrologer since 1991. Her ongoing passions are the moon and living the intuitive life. You can read more about her at Dana’s bio. Her website, Mooncircles, is not just a blog by Dana – it is a professionally produced website where Dana features a number of astrologers writing on various approaches and aspects. You will definitely find something to capture your interest.

Mooncircles:
Sagittarius Full Moon

   Rather than just one article, Dana’s website features a number of astrologers who offer a variety of personal viewpoints. (This personal approach is one of the big reasons I like her site.) Here are some brief teasers for her offerings at this full moon in Sagittarius:

  Sagittarius Full Moon: I Married an Alien! by April Elliott Kent
“I was born with Sagittarius, the sign of the foreigner, on the Ascendant of my chart, [and] part of me has always felt that I was born in the wrong place…”

  Sagittarius Full Moon: Strawberry Moon by Jessica Shepherd
“Some days trying to find myself is like trying to find keys in a snowstorm.”

  The Jinn Moon from Mooncircles archives
“During this Sagittarius Full Moon the Jinns are out in full force.”

  3-Minute Moon Ritual by Dana Gerhardt
“Imagine above you the round glowing disc of the moon, bathing you…”

 You can access each article by clicking on its link, or all of the above — and plenty more — on the home page of Mooncircles.

Full Moon in Sagittarius

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HUMOR

Calvin and Hobbes . . .

   . . . heirs to the world:

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FROM ME TO YOU

    Thank you, dear reader, for visiting EM&S this “moonth”. I hope you liked it.

   Here’s a little bit about me and what this blog is about. I’ve been fascinated with astronomy ever since I learned to read. I’m also interested in how objects in the heavens influence people. In this blog I collect facts and folklore (mostly from the Web) about our moon and other sky phenomena.

   If you especially liked something you saw here, or would like to see something in particular covered in a future issue, or you have something interesting about the Earth, Moon, or Stars you would like to share, please feel free to leave a comment. I’m always interested in how folks who stop by here are moved/influenced/affected by what they encounter here. And please don’t be shy about sharing this post with friends if you like it!

   Note that I have a separate post called ARCHIVES which contains a list of all the titles I’ve posted since the inception of this blog. The titles are clickable of course. Easier and more informative than just the dates that appear in the right-side Archives column. (I’m slowly learning more things I can make WordPress do. There’s a lot there!)

   Until the full moon in July,
here’s wishing you and me and all of us
a month of truth and celebration.

~ Moonlight to all!
Marty

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INTENTION FOR THIS EARTH, MOON AND STARS BLOG

   The Earth, Moon and Stars blog is published once each Full Moon with facts and lore about our moon and other sky phenomena that I find interesting. My wish is that you will have fun learning a bit more about heavenly objects, especially our one and only natural satellite and how all of us — people, animals, plants, water, even rocks — are affected and connected by her.

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MY PERSONAL TAKE ON ASTROLOGY

  Some folks have wondered why I have an astrology section in a blog that purports to be “science” oriented. I suppose I could cite ancient cultures in which astronomy and astrology were the domain of the same person. And that a broader way of understanding the aim of science is to expand knowledge (the word science being derived from the Latin word  scīre “to know”). My own sense is that while we humans live in a material world that runs by certain rules of physics, we each experience our lives in this world subjectively. It’s what makes us similar and at the same time unique.
   How much do celestial bodies influence our lives? Certainly the Sun and the Moon have noticeable gravitational effects on water and even rocks. Electromagnetic and particle radiation from the Sun has both obvious and subtle effects on just about everything on this planet. Even moonlight affects plants and animals.  I do not claim to know if or how much these and other celestial bodies affect us directly, but I like the wisdom, warmth and humanness that the astrologers I feature express in their writing, and believe that including them not only expands my potential audience, but also exposes folks to ways of thinking about their own lives that they might not have otherwise considered. Let me know your take on this. I won’t make your comment public if you ask me not to.

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A NOTE ON WRITING STYLE

    A few detail-oriented folks have inquired about my use (or mis-use) of Initial Caps in words like earth, moon, and sun. In the long run, it doesn’t affect understanding; whether I write ”the President” or “the president”, you still know who I’m referring to. I write “the Northern Hemisphere”, just as you would (correctly) write “the West Coast”; it’s a proper name, and in English we capitalize proper names.

    When it comes to suns and moons it can get confusing. There are billions of suns out there; we have given names to more than 40 million of them, ranging from names given in other languages (e.g., Aldebaran), to less fanciful but more utilitarian names, such as HD 140913. The International Astronomical Union (IAU) has decreed that our sun is the only one without such a proper name, although historically and in poesy it’s been called by quite a few.

    Similarly for our moon. We’ve christened all of the other 182 moons in our solar system with names – ours is the only one we call the Moon.

    Since we capitalize the names of all the other heavenly bodies (even asteroids and comets, for pity’s sake), I feel we ought to show at least as much respect for the ones most important to us. The IAU agrees.

    So does Wikipedia. Their Manual of Style says: “The words sun, earth, moon and solar system are capitalized (as proper names) when used in an astronomical context to refer to a specific celestial body (our Sun, Earth, Moon and Solar System): The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System; The Moon orbits the Earth. They are not capitalized when used outside an astronomical context (The sky was clear and the sun felt warm), or when used in a general sense (Io is a moon of Jupiter).”

    Sometimes it’s a fine line. If I write “by the light of the silvery moon”, I won’t capitalize it, because I’m referring to an image of the celestial body, not the body itself. By contrast, if I write, “the light from the Sun reflects off the surface of the Moon,” I capitalize both, because I’m referring directly to the celestial bodies.

    If you inspect the archives of this blog, you will likely see many instances where I departed from this rule. We’ll call these oversights, and eventually I will correct them. Meanwhile, it’s an interesting challenge just to follow it in new writings. Are we having fun, yet?

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COPYRIGHT DISCLAIMER

Unless otherwise noted, this blog claims no credit for any images or compositions (e.g. art, songs, poetry) appearing on it. Copyrighted works remain the property of their respective owners; attribution and/or links are provided when known. If there is content appearing on this blog that belongs to you and you do not wish for it to appear here, please leave a comment with your email address and a link to the item in question and it will be promptly removed. Your comment will not be made public.

Posted in astronomy, Constellations, Folklore, moon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

May’s Siqonomeq Moon

Welcome May Full Moon!

Welcome to Issue 5 of Volume IX of Earth, Moon and Stars!

IN THIS ISSUE
(click any of these section links)

INTRO

   Drama and suffering have been hallmarks of this world for a very long time. There’s also a lot of good. My first objective with this blog has always been to encourage people to lift their heads from their desks and TVs and phones and look up. More of my personal opinions, if you’re interested, in my Just Sayin’ section.

   If you’re new here and would like to learn first more about what we’re up to, click on Me to You to jump to my Intro section. (There’s a link there that will take you back to the above table of contents when you are ready.)

WHAT’S COOKIN’

FULLNESS
  The moon will become technically full Wednesday May 10 at 21:42 UTC, correspondingly earlier in time zones west of the Prime Meridian, later in time zones to the east. (See my December 2014 issue for some clarification about UTC and 24-hour time.)

   Because technical fullness this time will occur close to midnight at the Prime Meridian, Ms. Luna will appear fullest on Wednesday night/early Thursday morning almost everywhere on Earth. Folks just west of the International Date Line (Philippines, Australia, etc.) will get an approximately equal show Wednesday and Thursday nights. But note that to an unaided eye she will appear full 24 hours or so either side of technical fullness, so you will be able to see what appears to be a full moon three nights in a row. Check Seasonal Calendar below for exact times in some representative time zones.

MOON NAMES
   Past May issues have featured a variety of more or less standard names (such as Flower Moon) for this full moon. In keeping with our current penchant for lesser-known names, we turn this month to the Passamaquoddy tradition. Check out Moon Names for the lowdown.

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SKYWATCH
   The BIG ECLIPSE is coming! We’re giving you another heads up to get ready for August! Click Skywatch.

MOON-RELATED CELEBRATIONS
   It’s Vesak time again – the most important full moon in the Buddhist tradition. Check out Celebrations for pics and details.

JUST SAYIN’
   If you’ve been following my opinion section since its inception last July, you’ve seen that I’ve begun to head toward focusing on the future of the Earth. Last month I went back to 1946 for a relevant song. This month it’s an environmental song harking back to 1970. Click Just Sayin’.

ASTROLOGY
  This moon we continue with wonderful Cristina and showcase a fabulous, new (to us, anyway) moon-focused astrologer, Dana Gerhardt. Rather than read any more of my gush here, click Astrology to see what they’ve got for you!

HUMOR
  Continuing with Calvin and Hobbes in our Humor section, though in switching now from astrology to the environment, Calvin is now more philosophical.

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May Flower Moon (Beyond the Fields We Know)

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SEASONAL CALENDAR
Moon Dates and Times

May’s full moon       Weds May 10 21:42 UTC; 6:42 pm ADT; 5:42 pm EDT; 2:42 pm PDT; 11:42 am HAST
.                                    Thursday May 11 12:42 am IDT; 5:42 am AWST/PHT; 7:42 am AEST

May’s new moon     Thurs May 25 19:44 UTC; 4:44 pm ADT; 3:44 pm EDT; 12:44 pm PDT; 9:44 am HAST
.                                    Thursday May 25 10:44 pm IDT; 5:44 am AWST/PHT; 7:44 am AEST
.                                    Friday May 26 3:44 am AWST/PHT; 5:44 am AEST

June’s full moon       Friday June 9 13:10 UTC; 10:10 am ADT; 9:10 am EDT; 6:10 am PDT; 3:10 am HAST
.                                     Friday June 9 4:10 pm IDT; 9:10 pm AWST/PHT; 11:10 pm AEST

June solstice              Wednesday June 21 04:24 UTC; 7:24 am IDT; 12:24 pm AWST/PHT;  2:24 pm AEST
.                                     Wednesday June 21 12:24 am EDT
.                                     Tuesday June 20 9:24 pm PDT; 6:24 pm HAST

June’s new moon     Saturday June 24 02:31 UTC; 5:31 am IDT; 10:31 am AWST/PHT; 12:31 pm AEST
.                                     Friday June 23 11:31 pm ADT; 10:31 pm EDT; 7:31 pm PDT; 4:31 pm HAST

.                               Check Moon Giant to find Full Moon and New Moon times for your local time zone.

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MOON NAMES

Siqonomeq Moon

   Past May issues have featured a variety of more or less standard names for this full moon, such as hare, flower, frog, blue frog, and milk. Camas was lesser-known, and this month we continue this tradition by turning to the Passamaquoddy peoples, who knew this moon as the siqonomeq moon, which translates to alewife. (ref. Indian Moons by Phil Konstantin.)

Alewife Moon (PBS NOVA)

   Does that look like our Moon? Well, it was close enough to fool Google Images into thinking it was an “astronomical object”. Turns out, though, that it’s a magnified pic of an alewife fish inside its egg prior to hatching.

   The Passamaquoddy are an American Indian/First Nations people who live in northeastern North America, primarily in Maine (United States) and New Brunswick (Canada). They live along the waters of Passamaquoddy Bay and the rivers that flow to it. Their name stems from their word that translates to “pollock-spearer”, reflecting both the importance of fish in their culture and their preferred method of fishing. In addition to pollack, the alewife was an important food source.

Watts Bar alewife (photo by Jim Negus)

   Why did these people name the full moon at this time of year for the alewife fish? Well, the alewife (also called a river herring) is an anadromous fish which, like salmon, smelt, and shad, spawn in fresh water but live the rest of the time in the saltwater ocean. Starting in May and into June, the adult alewives return to their freshwater spawning grounds, causing what we call a “run”. This is an ideal time for birds and humans to pick off as many as they can.

   For more info, check out Maine Alewives, Alewife (Wikipedia), and Scent of an Alewife, which includes a 3 1/2 minute video about the life of this important and fascinating fish.

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SKYWATCH

AUGUST TOTAL ECLIPSE OF THE SUN: ACROSS THE U.S.!!

   While eclipses of the moon can usually be seen from over a broad range of locations around the Earth, the shadow that the Moon casts during a solar eclipse is, by comparison, very brief and narrow (on the order of 100 miles wide). I’m sure it’ll be all over the news as August 21 gets closer, but now would be a good time for you to start making plans if you want to be in the shadow’s path. See my January issue for details, and Wikipedia’s comprehensive article. Also see The Weather Channel’s page with animation of the shadow and recommendations for five places to consider traveling to. Doing a web search for Solar Eclipse 2017 will get you a plethora of hits.

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MOON-RELATED CELEBRATIONS

WESAK

   This full moon highlights the Eastern celebration of Wesak (Vesak, Vesākha or Buddha Purnima), at which time people who follow the Buddhist tradition in many countries celebrate the time when the Buddha reached enlightenment; thus regarding this full moon as the most powerful of the year. Sometimes informally called “Buddha’s Birthday”, it actually encompasses the birth, enlightenment (nirvāna), and passing away (parinirvāna) of Gautama Buddha.

Vesak in Malaysia (2016) (by chewlf)

   In Malaysia, this holiday is known as Hari Wesak and is a public holiday. Celebrations begin at dawn where devotees would gather in the various Buddhist temples scattered all around the country.

   Many festivals are held surrounding this day, often beginning days ahead and continuing for days afterward, and always full of color. The actual dates of celebration vary by country and local tradition; many celebrated it last month on the full moon in April. More interesting details at Malaysia Public Holidays and Vesak in Singapore.

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JUST SAYIN’

A New Thread

   I introduced this personal opinion section in last July’s issue to offer a more unifying perspective on the troubles and pain we humans continue to inflict on each other. Many poets have expressed how calming the moon can be . . . due ~ among other things ~ to her perspective from above, her constant blessing of us while we deal with chaos below, and especially to her silence. (See Just Sayin’ in last July’s issue for my expansion on this point of view.)

Earth and Moon from space

   This perspective sees all of us as equal passengers on this bright blue marble. You can check out previous issues back to July ’16 over there in the archives on the right to hear songs I’d found expressing this idea in a variety of styles.

   Last month I veered a bit and featured a song from 1946 on the danger of the atom bomb. If we somehow are able to avert WW III, we are still managing to soil our own nest – something other animals don’t do.

  One of my grammar school teachers back in 1953 told us the birch trees in Canada were dying because the annual average temperature there had risen by two degrees. 1953! Two measly degrees?? Pfft! Who cares‽‽

 

    In 1970 at age 26,  Canadian-born singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell visited Hawaii for the first time and was heartbroken when she saw the stark contrast between the beautiful lush mountains and the asphalt. This led to her composing “Big Yellow Taxi” with the refrain:

Don’t it always seem to go
That you don’t know what you’ve got ’til it’s gone?
They paved paradise
Put up a parking lot.

   Click this AZ Lyrics page for the full lyrics.

    Click the disc cover image below to hear her singing “Big Yellow Taxi”. A number of versions by her are on YouTube, including this live video, plus a variety of covers that you can find by searching.

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ASTROLOGY

Moon Travels Through the Zodiac

    Zipping Along. Unlike the Earth – which takes 365+ days to make a complete circuit through the zodiac – the moon takes just a month to complete an entire round. This means she spends on average only two and a half days in each zodiac sign.

   Opposition. Because at fullness the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun (opposition), it is in the zodiac sign that is opposite the sign that the sun is in. February’s Astrology section has a more detailed explanation.

Moon in Signs and Void of Course

   Technical astrologers call the times while Ms. Luna is in transition from one sign to the next “void of course”. This is considered to be a sort of neither-here-nor-there state, which many people feel as being unsettled or ungrounded. But as you might suspect, there are a number of ways of looking at and dealing with a VoC moon. Our most recent astrologer discovery Dana Gerhardt offers this interesting and encouraging outlook: “Fall into the Gap” on her Mooncircles website.   

   Each astrologer chooses their own method for calculating times of beginning and ending VoC. You can find interesting (though differing) VoC info and tables at Dr. Standley and at Moontracks.

   Referencing the Moontracks table, we find that Ms. Luna entered the sign of Scorpio on Tuesday (9th) at 05:00. She will begin exiting Scorpio — thus becoming VoC — at her time of technical fullness: Wednesday at 21:42, remaining void until the next day when she enters the next sign, Sagittarius, at 16:59. (All times here are UTC~Coordinated Universal Time.)

Scorpio Full Moon

Dana~  

Mooncircles

   When new friend Diana saw EarthMoonandStars, she said “You’ve got to check out Dana’s website. She’s a professional astrologer whose passion is the moon!” Did someone say “moon”?! I have two reactions when I discover something wonderful that I’ve been looking for: “Wow! How lucky I am!” and “Where have you been hiding?” Well, Dana has been far from hiding – see her mini bio below with a link to her full bio. I guess everything shows up just when it needs to . . .

   Dana Gerhardt is an internationally respected astrologer and a popular columnist with The Mountain Astrologer since 1991. Her ongoing passions are the moon and living the intuitive life. You can read more about her at Dana’s bio. Her website, Mooncircles, is not just a blog by Dana – it is a professionally produced website where Dana features a number of astrologers writing on various approaches and aspects. You will definitely find something to capture your interest.

Mooncircles:
Scorpio Full Moon

   Rather than just one article, Dana’s website features a number of astrologers who offer a variety of viewpoints. Here are some brief teasers for her offerings at this full moon in Scorpio:

  Scorpio Full Moon: Hades Heart by April Elliott Kent
“I may not have exulted over a madman’s corpse, but I’ve been thrilled…”

  The Scorpio Moon: Thrill of Desire by Jessica Shepherd
“Here’s how I know when fear is a red light and when it’s green…”

  Moonlight Ecstasy: Full Moon Fertility Ritual by Dana Gerhardt
“When your hands feel enlivened, awake, or like they’re vibrating…”

  3-Minute Moon Ritual by Dana Gerhardt
“Imagine above you the round glowing disc of the moon, bathing you…”

 You can access all of the above — and more — on the home page of Mooncircles.

Full Moon in Scorpio

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Cristina ~  

Full Moon in Scorpio
“Nightbook”

   Until this past January this space featured Æterna, who hosted a website she called Aeternalight Astrology. Since then, she has dropped the Æterna alias and is now going by her real name — Cristina.

   Cristina is a professional astrologer based in Italy, who also runs her own, new website Zodiac Poetry — “Stars – Heart – Soul”, where her emphasis is on introspection and emotions and her love of words and art. You can read about her in depth on her About Me page.

   For this full moon in Scorpio, Cristina tells us . . .

. . . this Full Moon in the most occult, secretive sign of the Zodiac is capable of shining a torch into the darkest pit, pushing unspoken feelings, hidden agendas and the overall subtext of our current reality, to the surface.

   Just wanted to throw you that teaser to entice you to take a look at Cristina’s full article: Full Moon in Scorpio – Nightbook. Because her style is both sensitive and pithy, I recommend that you set aside some quiet time to take it all in. 

Full Moon in Scorpio

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HUMOR

Calvin and Hobbes . . .

   . . . on forests and aliens:

   Apropos of this viewpoint, I recently attended a screening of “Racing Extinction“, a 2015 movie that was shown on Discovery Channel around the world. This is a very powerful movie. You can watch selected clips of it on YouTube. This Google search “racing extinction watch online” brings up many outlets where you can purchase, rent, or stream the entire movie, some advertising it for free. 

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FROM ME TO YOU

    Thank you, dear reader, for visiting EM&S this “moonth”. I hope you liked it.

   Here’s a little bit about me and what this blog is about. I’ve been fascinated with astronomy ever since I learned to read. I’m also interested in how objects in the heavens influence people. In this blog I collect facts and folklore (mostly from the Web) about our moon and other sky phenomena.

   If you especially liked something you saw here, or would like to see something in particular covered in a future issue, or you have something interesting about the Earth, Moon, or Stars you would like to share, please feel free to leave a comment. I’m always interested in how folks who stop by here are moved/influenced/affected by what they encounter here. And please don’t be shy about sharing this post with friends if you like it!

   Note that I have a separate post called ARCHIVES which contains a list of all the titles I’ve posted since the inception of this blog. The titles are clickable of course. Easier and more informative than just the dates that appear in the right-side Archives column. (I’m slowly learning more things I can make WordPress do. There’s a lot there!)

   Until the full moon in June,
here’s wishing you and me and all of us
a month of beauty and courage.

~ Moonlight to all!
Marty

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My Personal Take on Astrology

  Some folks have wondered why I have an astrology section in a blog that purports to be “science” oriented. I suppose I could cite ancient cultures in which astronomy and astrology were the domain of the same person. And that a broader way of understanding the aim of science is to expand knowledge (the word science being derived from the Latin word  scīre “to know”). My own sense is that while we humans live in a material world that runs by certain rules of physics, we each experience our lives in this world subjectively. It’s what makes us similar and at the same time unique.
   How much do celestial bodies influence our lives? Certainly the Sun and the Moon have noticeable gravitational effects on water and even rocks. Electromagnetic and particle radiation from the Sun has both obvious and subtle effects on just about everything on this planet. Even moonlight affects plants and animals.  I do not claim to know if or how much these and other celestial bodies affect us directly, but I like the wisdom, warmth and humanness that the astrologers I feature express in their writing, and believe that including them not only expands my potential audience, but also exposes folks to ways of thinking about their own lives that they might not have otherwise considered. Let me know your take on this. I won’t make your comment public if you ask me not to.

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A NOTE ON WRITING STYLE

    A few detail-oriented folks have inquired about my use (or mis-use) of Initial Caps in words like earth, moon, and sun. In the long run, it doesn’t affect understanding; whether I write ”the President” or “the president”, you still know who I’m referring to. I write “the Northern Hemisphere”, just as you would (correctly) write “the West Coast”; it’s a proper name, and in English we capitalize proper names.

    When it comes to suns and moons it can get confusing. There are billions of suns out there; we have given names to more than 40 million of them, ranging from names given in other languages (e.g., Aldebaran), to less fanciful but more utilitarian names, such as HD 140913. The International Astronomical Union (IAU) has decreed that our sun is the only one without such a proper name, although historically and in poesy it’s been called by quite a few.

    Similarly for our moon. We’ve christened all of the other 182 moons in our solar system with names – ours is the only one we call the Moon.

    Since we capitalize the names of all the other heavenly bodies (even asteroids and comets, for pity’s sake), I feel we ought to show at least as much respect for the ones most important to us. The IAU agrees.

    So does Wikipedia. Their Manual of Style says: “The words sun, earth, moon and solar system are capitalized (as proper names) when used in an astronomical context to refer to a specific celestial body (our Sun, Earth, Moon and Solar System): The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System; The Moon orbits the Earth. They are not capitalized when used outside an astronomical context (The sky was clear and the sun felt warm), or when used in a general sense (Io is a moon of Jupiter).”

    Sometimes it’s a fine line. If I write “by the light of the silvery moon”, I won’t capitalize it, because I’m referring to an image of the celestial body, not the body itself. By contrast, if I write, “the light from the Sun reflects off the surface of the Moon,” I capitalize both, because I’m referring directly to the celestial bodies.

    If you inspect the archives of this blog, you will likely see many instances where I departed from this rule. We’ll call these oversights, and eventually I will correct them. Meanwhile, it’s an interesting challenge just to follow it in new writings. Are we having fun, yet?

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INTENTION FOR THIS EARTH, MOON AND STARS BLOG

   The Earth, Moon and Stars blog is published once each Full Moon with (hopefully interesting) facts and lore about our moon and other sky phenomena. My wish is that you will have fun learning a bit more about our one and only natural satellite and how all of us — people, animals, plants, water, even rocks — are affected and connected by her.

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COPYRIGHT DISCLAIMER

Unless otherwise noted, this blog claims no credit for any images or compositions (e.g. songs, poetry) appearing on it. Copyrighted works remain the property of their respective owners; attribution and/or links are provided when known. If there is content appearing on this blog that belongs to you and you do not wish for it to appear here, please leave a comment with your email address and a link to the item in question and it will be promptly removed. Your comment will not be made public.

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