August’s BlackBerryCherry Full Moon

Happy August Full Moon

Welcome to Issue 8 of Volume VIII of Earth, Moon and Stars!

IN THIS ISSUE
(click any of these section links)

CURRENT EVENTS and THE MOON

   I started something last month when I introduced an opinion section into this blog. Since then I’ve renamed the section from My Thoughts to Just Sayin’. I think that’s going to stick. I’m not trying to troll here, but it would be interesting if any of you readers wanted to join in a discussion on whatever topic(s) you see here that you’re interested in.  Take a look and see what you think. (See Just Sayin’ in last month’s issue for my intention for this section.) In this issue I have more about All of Us

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WHAT’S COOKIN’

FULLNESS
   The moon will become full Thursday, August 18, at 09:27 UT, correspondingly earlier in time zones west of the Prime Meridian, later in time zones to the east. (See my December 2014 issue for some clarification about UT-Universal Time.)

  Because technical fullness will occur this time mid-morning at the Prime Meridian, Ms. Luna will appear about equally full both Wednesday and Thursday nights to folks in Nuuk, Greenland (two hours ahead of New York) and most of Brazil, as they will be on the cusp. East of the cusp to the International Date Line will see a fuller moon on Thursday night; west of the cusp to the Date Line (including the U.S. and Canada) will see a fuller moon on Wednesday night – although if you are near the cusp meridian both nights she will appear about the same. Check Seasonal Calendar below for exact times in some representative time zones.

Moon Over Tour Saint-Jacques, Paris (Pedro Jarque Krebs)

Full Moon Over Tour Saint-Jacques, Paris (Pedro Jarque Krebs)

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COOLING OFF
   For our Seasonings offering ~ a photo to feel a little cooler with.

MOON NAMES
   BlackBerryCherry sounded like a yummy combination. Check out Moon Names for some pictures and the story.

MOON MOTION QUIZ
   Continuing the journey we began last month, here’s the next step in my attempt to pique your interest in how our nearest sky neighbor shakes, rattles, and rolls. As noted last month, since the details of this rather large subject can become complex, we’re approaching it in small, simple steps. Here’s the quiz question for this month:

.Q: Does the moon rise earlier or later on successive days/nights? And by how much?

Click Moonmotion to see the answers.

JUST SAYIN’
   In this next installment of my new personal opinion section Just Sayin’, I continue the theme of All of Us with a song by that name.

MOON IN SONG
   I did find one song about the Blackberry Moon. Click song about the moon to jump to this section.

ASTROLOGY
   Molly Hall tells us there’s something wild in the air at this full moon in Aquarius. 

HUMOR
  In continuation of our new Humor section, Calvin (of Calvin and Hobbes) checks his horoscope.

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SEASONAL CALENDAR
Moon Dates and Times

August’s full moon           Thursday August 18 09:27 UT; 5:27 am EDT; 2:27 am PDT
.                                             Thursday August 18 12:27 pm IDT; 5:27 pm AWST/PHT;  7:27 pm AEST
.                                             Wednesday August 17 11:27 pm HAST
September’s new moon   Thursday Sept 1 09:03 UT; 5:03 am EDT; 2:03 am PDT
.                                             Thursday Sept 1 12:03 pm IDT; 5:03 pm AWST/PHT;  7:03 pm AEST
.                                             Wednesday August 31 11:03 pm HAST
September’s full moon    Friday Sept 16 19:05 UT; 9:05 am HAST; 12:05 pm PDT; 3:05 pm EDT; 10:05 pm IDT
.                                             Saturday Sept 17 3:05 am AWST/PHT; 5:05 am AEST
September Equinox          Thursday Sept 22 14:21 UT; 10:21 am EDT (covered in next issue)
.                                             Check out Moon Giant to see Full Moon and New Moon times for your local time zone.

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ANOTHER SEASON

It’s Not the Heat, It’s the Humidity

    Don’t know if this will work for you, but in the midst of sweltering, just looking at a photo like this helps me feel a little cooler.

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MOON NAMES

Black Berries and Cherries

    Many cultures in both hemispheres kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full moon, appropriate for the month in which it occurred and keyed –naturally enough – to the goings-on in their natural environment . . . the weather, the plants, the animals.

 The August moon is known by a wide variety of names, and we’ve covered quite a few in previous years. With still many to explore, I went to my favorite source for Native American moon names: Western Washington University’s American Indian Moons.

   There I discovered that the Northern Plains Assiniboine called the August moon “capasapsaba” meaning “black cherries”, while the Sioux said August was when “cherries turn black” and the Wishram (Columbia River, Washington, Oregon) called this full moon the “blackberry patches moon.” Well, that was enough for me, so BlackBerryCherry it is!

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MOON MOTION

 Moonrise Times

    Q: Does the moon rise earlier or later on successive days/nights? And by how much?

   A: Moonrise (also moonset) is anywhere from a half hour to an hour later each successive day/night. This is because Ms. Luna drifts in her orbit around Earth from our west to east (counter-clockwise if you were in space above Earth’s North Pole looking down). This is the same direction Earth is rotating, so we have to spin another hour or so to find her again the next day.

  Okay – I can hear some of you saying, “But wait! Doesn’t the moon travel from east to west? I mean, I see it rise in the east and travel across the sky and set in the west. What’s going on here?”

  Certainly this can be confusing at first . . . until you take a breath and ponder it calmly. The “apparent motion” we observe between moonrise and moonset is due to the spin or rotation of the Earth, which also makes the sun and stars appear to rise and set. Ms. Luna’s incremental rise-time tardiness is due to her real motion in orbit around us. (If her orbit were clockwise, or east-to-west, we would see her rise a bit earlier each successive day.)

Observe Moon Motion Against the Stars
.   One way to see this motion is to observe where the moon is on successive nights with respect to the background of fixed stars. (I put that in italics, because the stars ~ even though they themselves are ripping along at breakneck speeds ~ are so distant from us that they appear fixed.)

   Here’s a simple diagram that illustrates where the moon was on two successive nights this past May with respect to the (fixed) star Spica.

Moon and Spica (EarthSky)

Moon Motion With Respect to Spica (EarthSky)

   I added that note to EarthSky’s diagram above because the diameter of the moon as shown is too large for the distance moved in 24 hours. The image of the moon as we view it from Earth subtends an angle of about 1/2 degree of arc. (Think of the sky as a dome that is half a globe ~ 180 degrees from horizon to horizon.) Since she moves about 12 degrees in 24 hours, approximately speaking, twelve degrees for 30 days is 360 degrees. So in 24 hours she moves about 24 diameters.

Observe Moon Motion Against a Fixed Earth Object
.   Another way of reckoning this motion is to observe and plot it against an object fixed to the Earth. It’s the same “fixed reference point” idea, but now it’s something local to you. 
If you want to have a little fun — and perhaps help a child learn this experientially — you can try the project my seventh grade science teacher Mr. Cook assigned us. (Anyone reading this remember John Cook at Central School?)

   Over a period of, say, three to five evenings, preferably during the week before a full moon, go outside where you have an unobstructed view of the sky, but with some reference point (such as a tree or a building) that you can plot the moon’s position against. Now at the same time every evening illustrate on a large piece of poster board where you see the moon with respect to this fixed reference point, and what shape it is.

Moon Over Tree Hole (© Ron Storey)

Moon Over Tree Hole Ron Storey)

   The keys to the above exercise, of course, are (1)that landmark and (2)the same-time viewing. (This is necessary, of course, because now that fixed reference object is whirling around on the same platform you’re standing on.)

   What we all saw when we finished our projects was the moon drifting eastward by many times its apparent diameter each successive evening . . . and getting fuller each night, too. Let me know if you do try this experiment, and what your results were.

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JUST SAYIN’

Continuing the “All of Us” Theme

   Remember last month when I put (??) after “Happy”? Those ?-marks were reflecting the widespread outlook that we can’t be ~ or won’t allow ourselves to be ~ happy while people are being inhumane to each other. In this mindset it feels we are being disloyal to and abandoning the innocent victims if we allow ourselves to feel anything good. (See Just Sayin’ in last month’s issue for my expansion on this point of view.)

   As I said last month, I believe the moon (among others) offers the healing/uniting perspective that we’re all equal passengers on this bright blue marble. I’ve rounded up at least four songs on this theme, and for openers last month I chose the oldie: “The Moon Belongs to Everyone ~ The Best Things In Life Are Free“.

   This month I feature another song with this theme of inclusivity: “(God Belongs to) All of Us” by San Diego singer/songwriter Karl Anthony. Click the photo to open the YouTube page where you can listen to it.

“All of Us” by Karl Anthony (karlanthony.com)

   Here is the chorus:

Halle-halle-hallelujah
Namaste
Om and Amen
Praise Allah
Shalom . . .
God belongs to all of us
All of us

   Karl has his own website at www.karlanthony.com where you can listen to some of his other songs.

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THE MOON IN SONG

“The Blackberry Moon” by Rogue Valley

   Songs about the Blackberry Moon were scarce, at least in my search. This one’s somewhat melancholy, but it does capture what we can sometimes feel under Ms. Luna’s influence.  Click on the photo to open the YouTube page where you can listen to it.

The Blackberry Moon by Rogue Valley

The Blackberry Moon (by Rogue Valley)

Here’s one of the stanzas:

My father used to bring me
In the waning summer days
When the vines were heavy with blackberries
We’d fill the buckets over
Let ’em spill on the trail
Until the sun set low
And the moon would prevail

    If you’re interested in the lyrics, you can see the complete set here.

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ASTROLOGY

Moon Travels Through the Zodiac

  Unlike the Earth – which takes 365+ days to make a complete circuit through the zodiac – the moon takes just a month to complete an entire round. This means she spends on average only two and a half days in each zodiac sign.

Moon in Signs and Void of Course

   Technical astrologers call the times while Ms. Luna is transitioning from one sign to the next “void of course”. This is considered to be a sort of neither-here-nor-there state, which many people feel as being unsettled or ungrounded. You can find interesting VoC info and tables at Moontracks.

   Referencing the above tables, we find that Ms. Luna began leaving Capricorn and became VoC Monday (15th) at 7:45 pm. She will then enter Aquarius Tuesday (16th) at 4:52 am and remain in Aquarius until Thursday (18th) at 2:26 am, when she will again become VoC until 9:34 that night, when she will enter Pisces.

   Note that she will become technically full at 2:27 am, one minute after becoming VoC. I also note that while this is significant to some technical astrologers, Molly (see article, below) does not pull VoC into her readings. If/when I find an astrologer I like who does, I will add them. (All above times in PDT.)

Full moon in Aquarius

Molly Hall ~  

Aquarius Full Moon
Out of the Blue

   Molly Hall is resident astrologer at about.com, where she provides both technical and practical insights derived from traditional interpretations of the positions of the stars and planets. Molly tells us this Aquarius full moon …has a buzz that others don’t have. That’s because something is in the air — something wild! She goes on to say:

Aquarius is an edge walker, puling energies from sources out of this world. (…) Aquarius rides in on different currents, to break with what’s established. There’s a mystery to the fusion of Aquarius, so that it earns the rep of triggering quantum jumps — these are dramatic changes, when something clicks, a leap of progress.

   Well, void of course or not, Ms. Luna is going to be full for a couple of days, and I can certainly use a leap of progress! If that’s singing your tune, too, check out all the details ~ including forecasts for each House ~ at Molly’s article Aquarius Full Moon in Houses
Out of the Blue.”

   In addition to her insights around this full moon, Molly offers the following helpful articles:

   Also visit Molly’s front page for lots more interesting astrology.

Aquarius full moon

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HUMOR

Calvin and Hobbes: Mom vs. the Moon

   Continuing the Calvin and Hobbes series we began last month, in which Calvin embraces his horoscope in an attempt to get his way. Here is the second in this series of six . . .

Calvin Embraces His Horoscope

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FROM ME TO YOU

    Thank you, dear reader, for visiting EM&S this “moontb”. I hope you liked it.

   If you especially liked (or disliked) something you saw here, or would like to see something in particular covered in a future issue, or you have something interesting about the Earth, Moon, or Stars you would like to share, please feel free to leave a comment. I’m always interested in how folks who stop by here are moved/influenced/affected by what they encounter here. And don’t be shy about sharing this post with friends if you like it!

   Note that I now have a separate page called ARCHIVES which contains a list of all the titles I’ve posted since the inception of this blog. The titles are clickable, of course. Easier and more informative than just the dates that appear in the right-side Archives column. (I’m slowly learning things I can make WordPress do. There’s a lot there!)

   Until the full moon in September, here’s wishing all of us a month of wild buzz and dramatic changes!
~ Moonlight to all, Marty

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My Personal Take on Astrology

  Some folks have wondered why I have an astrology section in a blog that purports to be “science” oriented. I suppose I could cite ancient cultures in which astronomy and astrology were the domain of the same person. And that a broader way of understanding the aim of science is to expand knowledge (the word science being derived from the Latin word  scīre “to know”). My own sense is that while we humans live in a material world that runs by certain rules of physics, we each experience our lives in this world subjectively. It’s what makes us similar and at the same time unique.
   How much do celestial bodies influence our lives? Certainly the Sun and the Moon have noticeable gravitational effects on water and even rocks. Electromagnetic and particle radiation from the Sun has both obvious and subtle effects on just about everything on this planet. Even moonlight affects plants and animals.  I do not claim to know if or how much these and other celestial bodies affect us directly, but I like the wisdom, warmth and humanness that the astrologers I feature express in their writing, and believe that including them not only expands my potential audience, but also exposes folks to ways of thinking about their own lives that they might not have otherwise considered. Let me know your take on this. I won’t make your comment public if you ask me not to.

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A NOTE ON WRITING STYLE

    A few detail-oriented folks have inquired about my use (or mis-use) of Initial Caps in words like earth, moon, and sun. In the long run, it doesn’t affect understanding; whether I write ”the President” or “the president”, you still know who I’m referring to. I write “the Northern Hemisphere”, just as you would (correctly) write “the West Coast”; it’s a proper name, and in English we capitalize proper names.

    When it comes to suns and moons it can get confusing. There are billions of suns out there; we have given names to more than 40 million of them, ranging from names given in other languages (e.g., Aldebaran), to less fanciful but more utilitarian names, such as HD 140913. The International Astronomical Union (IAU) has decreed that our sun is the only one without such a proper name, although historically and in poesy it’s been called by quite a few.

    Similarly for our moon. We’ve christened all of the other 182 moons in our solar system with names – ours is the only one we call the Moon.

    Since we capitalize the names of all the other heavenly bodies (even asteroids and comets, for pity’s sake), I feel we ought to show at least as much respect for the ones most important to us. The IAU agrees.

    So does Wikipedia. Their Manual of Style says: “The words sun, earth, moon and solar system are capitalized (as proper names) when used in an astronomical context to refer to a specific celestial body (our Sun, Earth, Moon and Solar System): The Sun is the star at the center of the Solar System; The Moon orbits the Earth. They are not capitalized when used outside an astronomical context (The sky was clear and the sun felt warm), or when used in a general sense (Io is a moon of Jupiter).”

    Sometimes it’s a fine line. If I write “by the light of the silvery moon”, I won’t capitalize it, because I’m referring to an image of the celestial body, not the body itself. By contrast, if I write, “the light from the Sun reflects off the surface of the Moon,” I capitalize both, because I’m referring directly to the celestial bodies.

    If you inspect the archives of this blog, you will likely see many instances where I departed from this rule. We’ll call these oversights, and eventually I will correct them. Meanwhile, it’s an interesting challenge just to follow it in new writings. Are we having fun, yet?

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INTENTION FOR THIS EARTH, MOON AND STARS BLOG

   The Earth, Moon and Stars blog is published once each Full Moon with (hopefully interesting) facts and lore about our moon and other sky phenomena. My wish is that you will have fun learning a bit more about our one and only natural satellite and how all of us — people, animals, plants, water, even rocks — are affected and connected by her.

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COPYRIGHT DISCLAIMER

Unless otherwise noted, this blog claims no credit for any images or compositions (e.g. songs, poetry) appearing on it. Copyrighted works remain the property of their respective owners; attribution and/or links are provided when known. If there is content appearing on this blog that belongs to you and you do not wish for it to appear here, please leave a comment with your email address and a link to the item in question and it will be promptly removed. Your comment will not be made public.

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About aquarianman

Aquarian interested in anything to do with the Earth, our Moon, and anything flying around out there in space.
This entry was posted in astronomy, Constellations, Folklore, moon and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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